Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Judge slaps cable's Marty

Ex-celeb convicted of trespassing

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He became a local celebrity of sorts for his quirky cable-access television show that carved out a loyal audience in Winnipeg in the early 1990s.

But Martin Green -- known to many as "Math with Marty" -- is now making a name for himself as a thorn in the side of local educators and justice officials.

Green, 57, was convicted Friday of trespassing following a provincial court trial in which he acted as his own lawyer. This type of charge wouldn't normally make headlines, but the facts of the case are anything but routine.

Green enrolled in the faculty of education at the University of Winnipeg in the fall of 2011, wanting to pursue his dream of becoming a teacher. But he soon found himself on the outside looking in, expelled from the program for "misconduct" following a series of concerning incidents.

'The principal of the high school cited non-compliance with directions and agitated, confrontational behaviour'

-- provincial court Judge Anne Krahn, in her 40-page written decision

Green was accused of making a throat-slash gesture at one of his instructors in class, becoming repeatedly "aggressive and disruptive" with instructors, "hijacking" their classes and displaying alarming behaviour while at a practicum placement at Gordon Bell High School.

"The principal of the high school cited non-compliance with directions and agitated, confrontational behaviour," provincial court Judge Anne Krahn said in her 40-page written decision Friday.

There have been numerous meetings, hearings and appeals and even lawsuits over the past couple of years, but the initial decision for a year-long suspension was not overturned. In fact, things got worse.

The final straw came when Green went to the private residence of one of the school administrators and had a confrontation, which included pushing in the doorway and required police to be called. No charges were laid at the time.

But following that incident, Green's suspension was made permanent. He was also ordered by school officials not to go on campus.

That was the basis of his arrest in February 2013, when Green defied the order and was found inside the school.

Green acted as his own lawyer at trial and testified in his own defence. He claimed he was innocent of trespassing because the "barring order" made against him was malicious and he was being unfairly muzzled by the university.

"Mr. Green testified both in direct and cross-examination that it is important and proper to disagree with professors. He admitted numerous incidents where he had disagreed with the professor and pointed out in the class that the professor was wrong," Krahn said Friday.

Krahn agreed Green had a right to speak up -- but said the way he did it was over the line and showed he had a "single-minded determinedness to demonstrate that his point of view is the superior one."

"I accept that it is a normal and reasonable interpretation by both students and faculty, from Mr. Green's disagreements with professors and how he voiced them in class that he was intimidating, and it was interfering with other students' ability to learn," said Krahn.

"There is no doubt that Mr. Green is a very intelligent man. But his style of delivery, which I believe, based on the evidence I heard and the manner in which he testified, demonstrate that Mr. Green does easily become agitated, he raises his voice, he uses large dramatic body language and dramatic verbal language.

"His explanations are lengthy and rambling."

Krahn found Green not guilty of an additional charge of mischief.

www.mikeoncrime.com

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 30, 2014 A13

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