Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Redwood Bridge to be renamed after Lazarenko

  • Print
Mynarski Coun. Ross Eadie  authored the  motion to rename the Redwood Bridge after  longtime city councillor Harry Lazarenko.

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Enlarge Image

Mynarski Coun. Ross Eadie authored the motion to rename the Redwood Bridge after longtime city councillor Harry Lazarenko. Photo Store

After 106 years, the Redwood Bridge is no more -- but don't go blaming illusionist David Copperfield.

City council voted Wednesday to change the name of Winnipeg's oldest functioning motor-vehicle bridge after former councillor Harry Lazarenko, who spent two stints on city council spanning 30 years.

In a unanimous vote, council changed the name of Redwood Bridge to Harry Lazarenko Bridge. The motion was authored by Lazarenko's successor, Mynarski Coun. Ross Eadie, who had failed in an earlier effort to rename the North End's Machray Park after Lazarenko. The Redwood Bridge was built in 1908 to connect the North End with Elmwood. The origin of the name Redwood is a matter of dispute.

The Manitoba Historical Society maintains Redwood was the name of a home built near the future site of the bridge in 1857 by William Inkster, a son of fur trade-era settler John Inkster, and later owned by brewer, city councillor and MLA Edward Drewery.

The society also cites Redwood as an area of the Red River Settlement where Alfred Boyd, one of Manitoba's first MLAs and the first provincial secretary, used to live.

"I'm hearing different versions, different stories and I don't know which one is 100 per cent correct," said Mayor Sam Katz, who seconded Eadie's motion.

Katz said the city does not change names of any geographic feature named after a significant Manitoban. Eadie insisted earlier this week Redwood is not the name of a person, but a place.

Council chose to recognize Lazarenko on the basis of the exceptional length of his public service and his devotion to riverbank protection.

Lazarenko sat on council from 1974 to 1977 and then again from 1983 to 2010. He suffered a brain aneurysm in May 2010 and did not return to office for the final months of his last term.

bartley.kives@freepress.mb.ca

 

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition June 26, 2014 B3

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Trucks power through flooded underpass at Main St and Higgins

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • June 25, 2013 - 130625  -  A storm lit up Winnipeg Tuesday, June 25, 2013. John Woods / Winnipeg Free Press - lightning
  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

What do you think of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s comment that Tina Fontaine’s slaying was a crime, and not part of a larger sociological problem?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google