Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Risky killer to live in city

Manslaughter term up Monday

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A career criminal and convicted killer police believe is a high risk to reoffend violently is choosing to live in Winnipeg now that his prison sentence is about to expire Jan. 20.

Terry Allan Herman, 41, has been doing time for killing a mother of five in Vancouver's troubled Downtown Eastside.

Herman consented Friday to let Winnipeg police and Manitoba Corrections keep strict tabs on him for the next two years as tries to rebuild his life in the outside world.

City police have obtained a court-sanctioned peace bond against him, which they hope will help them supervise him in the community.

Herman has spent more than six years in prison for manslaughter in the stabbing death of Marilyn Whiskeyjack, 42, in a Vancouver rooming house on Sept. 14, 2007.

Herman and Whiskeyjack were in a short romantic relationship and had just started living together after his arrival in Vancouver from Toronto.

Herman stabbed the petite woman several times in a dispute. Other rooming-house residents heard her yelling "rape," or "he's raping me," the B.C. Supreme Court justice who sentenced him was told.

She "begged" for help from neighbours after she was wounded but bled to death in a hallway. They ignored her pleas because of the frequent violence in the building and her tendency to "cry wolf," Justice Frits Verhoeven said. Herman represented himself at sentencing and refused to give the court relevant information.

He has 19 convictions for violence dating from 1994. Many of his crimes involve substance abuse and an inability to deal with "crisis situations" such as personal and financial problems, police say in records filed in court.

Some prior crimes include stealing a coach-style bus while intoxicated and driving it for nearly half an hour before slamming it into a Toronto streetcar in 2005, twice sexually groping a duty-counsel lawyer in 2006 and using a beer bottle to hit and stab a man in 2003, police say.

Herman was one of a rare number of federal inmates denied statutory release by the Parole Board of Canada after serving two-thirds of his sentence. "You remain assessed as a high risk of both violent and sexual reoffending," board members Sam Reimer and Patricia Pitsula wrote in an August 2013 decision to keep him locked up.

The peace bond Herman agreed to Friday includes many conditions, including a nightly curfew and a requirement to report any romantic relationships to officials. He's banned from drinking, drugs, weapons and bars.

james.turner@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 18, 2014 A9

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