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CMHR excavation

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The archeological dig conducted at the site of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg uncovered the largest concentration of pre-European encampments anywhere in Canada. Officials unveiled some of the artifacts Wednesday, August 28.

  • Clarence and Barbara Nepinak talk to the media at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights news conference. Ojibway elders blessed the announcement with a traditional prayer.

    Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press

    Clarence and Barbara Nepinak talk to the media at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights news conference. Ojibway elders blessed the announcement with a traditional prayer.

  • A four-year block excavation of land below what's now the Canadian Museum for Human Rights at The Forks — as well as archeological work conducted during the construction of the $351-million museum — uncovered 191 separate hearths and a total of 400,000 artifacts, museum officials and archeologists announced.

    Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press

    A four-year block excavation of land below what's now the Canadian Museum for Human Rights at The Forks — as well as archeological work conducted during the construction of the $351-million museum — uncovered 191 separate hearths and a total of 400,000 artifacts, museum officials and archeologists announced.

  • Senior archaeologist Sid Kroker holds a plaster cast of a moccasin footprint found at the archeological dig conducted at the site of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. The findings suggest the area was inhabited more frequently, by more people than was previously believed.

    Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press

    Senior archaeologist Sid Kroker holds a plaster cast of a moccasin footprint found at the archeological dig conducted at the site of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. The findings suggest the area was inhabited more frequently, by more people than was previously believed.

  • Jaw bones and a skull from a horse can be seen in the foreground. Pieces of pottery, arrowheads and bison horns are among the other items displayed in the background.

    Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press

    Jaw bones and a skull from a horse can be seen in the foreground. Pieces of pottery, arrowheads and bison horns are among the other items displayed in the background.

  • Work goes on at the archeological dig in Winnipeg in this handout photo. The dig took place between November 2008 and 2012.

    Handout / The Canadian Press

    Work goes on at the archeological dig in Winnipeg in this handout photo. The dig took place between November 2008 and 2012.

  • Pieces of pottery found during the archaeological excavations at the site of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

    Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press

    Pieces of pottery found during the archaeological excavations at the site of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

  • An example of the ceramics found in an archeological dig is shown in this photo.

    Handout / The Canadian Press

    An example of the ceramics found in an archeological dig is shown in this photo.

  • A double-pointed bone needle found in the archeological dig is shown.

    Handout / The Canadian Press

    A double-pointed bone needle found in the archeological dig is shown.

  • Awls found in the archeological dig are shown.

    Handout / The Canadian Press

    Awls found in the archeological dig are shown.

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