August 30, 2015


Photo Galleries

Mementoes of war

A dented shaving mirror which saved John Falloon's life during the First World War. The mirror — and a deck of cards over it — stopped a bullet. The bullet fragment is on the mirror. (Submitted photo)
A bullet fragment on a dented shaving mirror owned by John Falloon. The mirror saved his life during the First World War. (Submitted photo)
Brian Baird has a wooden prop from the plane Farmen Experimental 2, or FE2b, his grandfather LT. G. Baird  (RFC) Squadron 148  crashed in during the First World War in France. (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Picture of the actual plane Baird flew in during the First World War with his observer in front seat.  (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Neil Ross has memorabilia from both his grandfathers who were in the First World War. (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Neil Ross has memorabilia from both his grandfathers who were in the First World War. (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bill Anderson with his bayonet for a Ross rifle part of his  grandfather's First World War memorabilia. (Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press)
William Faulkner and the Canadian Army Medical Corps in Winnipeg prior to departing for France.  (Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press)
Korey Dyck, Director of the Mennonite Heritage Centre with a photocopy of Rev. David M. Stoesz's First World War exemption card. (The original card is at the Canadian War Museum.)  (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)
Allison Bridge has a card that her grandfather sent to her grandmother (his wife) confirming that he was now a prisoner of war.  (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Allison Bridge has a card that her grandfather sent to her grandmother (his wife) confirming that he was a prisoner of war.  (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Margaret McMillan holds a photograph, medals and pay book belonging to her grandfather Dugald McMillan, with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in the First World War. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Mildred Wright has her father Carl Rosenberg's medals from the First World War along with a photo of him and his brother in uniform.  (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Albert Rosenberg fought with the British Expeditionary Forces, termed a
Robert Galston still has this footlocker which belonged to his late father-in-law P.G. Agnew, who died in 1968.  (Sarah Taylor / Winnipeg Free Press)
Peter G. Agnew's footlocker is rusted and worm, but remains a family treasure. (Sarah Taylor / Winnipeg Free Press)
Rick Weind has a vintage shovel which infantry troops were given to dig trenches and foxholes during the First World War.  (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)
Infantry troops were given shovels like this to dig trenches and foxholes during the First World War.  (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)
Clayton Sands was a signaler in the First World War and was on duty when the message came out that the war would end at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918. He kept his original signal. (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Clayton Sands was a signaler in the First World War and was on duty when the message came out that the war would end at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918. He kept his original signal. (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
A dented shaving mirror which saved John Falloon's life during the First World War. The mirror — and a deck of cards over it — stopped a bullet. The bullet fragment is on the mirror. - (Submitted photo)
A bullet fragment on a dented shaving mirror owned by John Falloon. The mirror saved his life during the First World War. - (Submitted photo)
Brian Baird has a wooden prop from the plane Farmen Experimental 2, or FE2b, his grandfather LT. G. Baird (RFC) Squadron 148 crashed in during the First World War in France. - (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Picture of the actual plane Baird flew in during the First World War with his observer in front seat. - (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Neil Ross has memorabilia from both his grandfathers who were in the First World War. - (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Neil Ross has memorabilia from both his grandfathers who were in the First World War. - (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Bill Anderson with his bayonet for a Ross rifle part of his grandfather's First World War memorabilia. - (Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press)
William Faulkner and the Canadian Army Medical Corps in Winnipeg prior to departing for France. - (Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press)
Korey Dyck, Director of the Mennonite Heritage Centre with a photocopy of Rev. David M. Stoesz's First World War exemption card. (The original card is at the Canadian War Museum.) - (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)
Allison Bridge has a card that her grandfather sent to her grandmother (his wife) confirming that he was now a prisoner of war. - (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Allison Bridge has a card that her grandfather sent to her grandmother (his wife) confirming that he was a prisoner of war. - (David Lipnowski / Winnipeg Free Press)
Margaret McMillan holds a photograph, medals and pay book belonging to her grandfather Dugald McMillan, with Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in the First World War. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Mildred Wright has her father Carl Rosenberg's medals from the First World War along with a photo of him and his brother in uniform. - (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Albert Rosenberg fought with the British Expeditionary Forces, termed a "contemptible little army" by the German kaiser. - (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Robert Galston still has this footlocker which belonged to his late father-in-law P.G. Agnew, who died in 1968. - (Sarah Taylor / Winnipeg Free Press)
Peter G. Agnew's footlocker is rusted and worm, but remains a family treasure. - (Sarah Taylor / Winnipeg Free Press)
Rick Weind has a vintage shovel which infantry troops were given to dig trenches and foxholes during the First World War. - (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)
Infantry troops were given shovels like this to dig trenches and foxholes during the First World War. - (Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press)
Clayton Sands was a signaler in the First World War and was on duty when the message came out that the war would end at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918. He kept his original signal. - (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)
Clayton Sands was a signaler in the First World War and was on duty when the message came out that the war would end at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918. He kept his original signal. - (Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press)

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