August 3, 2015


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Search for mudslide survivors continues

Washington State Patrol chaplains Joel Smith, left, and Mike Neil, right, watch as workers using heavy equipment work to clear debris, Tuesday, March 25, from Washington Highway 530 on the western edge of the massive mudslide that struck near Arlington, Wash. Saturday, killing at least 16 people and leaving dozens missing.
Washington State Department of Transportation safety manager Mike Breysse examines the areas devastated by Saturday's giant mudslide.
Rescue workers carry an inflatable boat to the flooded area in the debris field caused by the massive mudslide above the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River onto Highway 530, as recovery efforts are underway.
A searcher uses a small boat to look through debris from the deadly mudslide. At least 14 people were killed in the 1-square-mile slide that hit in a rural area about 55 miles northeast of Seattle on Saturday. Several people also were critically injured, and homes were destroyed.
Searchers on water and land look through debris following the mudslide in Oso, Wash.
A damaged home sits in the debris field caused by the massive mudslide.
Elaine Young holds a bible pulled out of the debris field from the mudslide above the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River onto Highway 530, as recovery efforts are underway, near Oso, Wash.
Sonny Blankenship, 18, a senior at Westin High School in Arlington, Wash., walks home from the Oso Fire Department after spending the day volunteering in the mudslide area in Oso, Wash. Blankenship, who lives across the street from the Oso Fire Department, took the day off from school to sort through debris in the slide area just miles from his home.
Shelby Stafford, 14, and Hailey Hudson, 17, hold a banner they made at Darrington High School in the wake of Saturday's mudslide in Snohomish County.
Darrington High School students make posters in the wake of Saturday's mudslide on Highway 530 in Snohomish County.
Volunteers with chainsaws march down a rugged path toward the scene of the deadly mudslide that hit Saturday.
Volunteers and firefighters with chainsaws and hand tools hike down toward the scene.
Volunteers arrive at the Oso Fire Department in Oso, Wash.
Teresa Welter cries as she holds a candle at a candlelight vigil in Arlington, Wash., for the victims of the massive mudslide that struck the nearby community of Oso, Wash., killing at least 16 people and leaving dozens missing.
Washington State Patrol chaplains Joel Smith, left, and Mike Neil, right, watch as workers using heavy equipment work to clear debris, Tuesday, March 25, from Washington Highway 530 on the western edge of the massive mudslide that struck near Arlington, Wash. Saturday, killing at least 16 people and leaving dozens missing. - Ted S. Warren, Pool / The Associated Press
Washington State Department of Transportation safety manager Mike Breysse examines the areas devastated by Saturday's giant mudslide. - Lindsey Wasson / Seattle Times / MCT
Rescue workers carry an inflatable boat to the flooded area in the debris field caused by the massive mudslide above the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River onto Highway 530, as recovery efforts are underway. - Marcus Yam / Seattle Times / MCT
A searcher uses a small boat to look through debris from the deadly mudslide. At least 14 people were killed in the 1-square-mile slide that hit in a rural area about 55 miles northeast of Seattle on Saturday. Several people also were critically injured, and homes were destroyed. - Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press
Searchers on water and land look through debris following the mudslide in Oso, Wash. - Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press
A damaged home sits in the debris field caused by the massive mudslide. - Marcus Yam / Seattle Times / MCT
Elaine Young holds a bible pulled out of the debris field from the mudslide above the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River onto Highway 530, as recovery efforts are underway, near Oso, Wash. - Marcus Yam / Seattle Times / MCT
Sonny Blankenship, 18, a senior at Westin High School in Arlington, Wash., walks home from the Oso Fire Department after spending the day volunteering in the mudslide area in Oso, Wash. Blankenship, who lives across the street from the Oso Fire Department, took the day off from school to sort through debris in the slide area just miles from his home. - Mark Mulligan / The Associated Press / The Herald
Shelby Stafford, 14, and Hailey Hudson, 17, hold a banner they made at Darrington High School in the wake of Saturday's mudslide in Snohomish County. - Joshua Trujillo / The Associated Press / seattlepi.com
Darrington High School students make posters in the wake of Saturday's mudslide on Highway 530 in Snohomish County. - Joshua Trujillo / The Associated Press / seattlepi.com
Volunteers with chainsaws march down a rugged path toward the scene of the deadly mudslide that hit Saturday. - Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press
Volunteers and firefighters with chainsaws and hand tools hike down toward the scene. - Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press
Volunteers arrive at the Oso Fire Department in Oso, Wash. - Mark Mulligan / The Associated Press / The Herald
Teresa Welter cries as she holds a candle at a candlelight vigil in Arlington, Wash., for the victims of the massive mudslide that struck the nearby community of Oso, Wash., killing at least 16 people and leaving dozens missing. - Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

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