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Tears for Tina

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  • Tina Fontaine's photographs sit on top of her casket surrounded by  flowers and items in the colour purple, her favourite colour, in front of Roman Catholic Church at Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday for her funeral.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Tina Fontaine's photographs sit on top of her casket surrounded by flowers and items in the colour purple, her favourite colour, in front of Roman Catholic Church at Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday for her funeral.

  • Thelma Favel is comforted by her niece Katie-Lee Fontaine and son Bryan Favel while her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Thelma Favel is comforted by her niece Katie-Lee Fontaine and son Bryan Favel while her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

  • Thelma Favel is comforted by her niece Katie-Lee Fontaine while her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Thelma Favel is comforted by her niece Katie-Lee Fontaine while her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

  • Thelma Favel broke down in tears and was comforted by her daughter Samatha Barto after her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Thelma Favel broke down in tears and was comforted by her daughter Samatha Barto after her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

  • Thelma Favel broke down in tears and was comforted by her daughter Samatha Barto after her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Thelma Favel broke down in tears and was comforted by her daughter Samatha Barto after her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation following her funeral Saturday.

  • After the funeral for Tina Fontaine Saturday in Sagkeeng First Nation her grandmother, Thelma Favel, sat at the grave site of Tina's father, Eugene Robert Fontaine, the same site Tina Fontaine will be laid to rest in the coming days. Favel broke down into tears while begging her nephew's forgiveness for the death of Tina.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    After the funeral for Tina Fontaine Saturday in Sagkeeng First Nation her grandmother, Thelma Favel, sat at the grave site of Tina's father, Eugene Robert Fontaine, the same site Tina Fontaine will be laid to rest in the coming days. Favel broke down into tears while begging her nephew's forgiveness for the death of Tina.

  • Pallbearers carry Tina Fontaine's casket outside the church Saturday after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Pallbearers carry Tina Fontaine's casket outside the church Saturday after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

  • Pallbearers carry Tina Fontaine's casket outside the church Saturday her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Pallbearers carry Tina Fontaine's casket outside the church Saturday her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

  • Tina Fontaine's family members pause before carrying her casket outside the church Saturday following her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

    Ruth Bonneville

    Tina Fontaine's family members pause before carrying her casket outside the church Saturday following her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

  • Tina Fontaine's family members are stricken with grief moments before carrying her body outside the church Saturday following her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Tina Fontaine's family members are stricken with grief moments before carrying her body outside the church Saturday following her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.

  • Tina Fontaine's older brother Dillion St. Paul is grief stricken as spends some final moments with his little sister's casket after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation.  During the service Dillion St. Paul cut off his braided ponytail and left it on her casket as part of a native family tradition.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Tina Fontaine's older brother Dillion St. Paul is grief stricken as spends some final moments with his little sister's casket after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation. During the service Dillion St. Paul cut off his braided ponytail and left it on her casket as part of a native family tradition.

  • Tina Fontaine's aunt, Lee Bacon tries to hold back her tears while she talks about her niece after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday.   Bacon made all of the flower arrangements for her funeral in her favourite colour purple.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Tina Fontaine's aunt, Lee Bacon tries to hold back her tears while she talks about her niece after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday. Bacon made all of the flower arrangements for her funeral in her favourite colour purple.

  • Tina Fontaine's casket is surrounded by flowers and items in the colour purple, her favourite colour, in front of Roman Catholic Church at Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Tina Fontaine's casket is surrounded by flowers and items in the colour purple, her favourite colour, in front of Roman Catholic Church at Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday.

  • Tina Fontaine's photographs sit on top of her casket surrounded by flowers and items in the colour purple, her favourite colour, at Roman Catholic Church in Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday at her funeral.

    Tina Fontaine's photographs sit on top of her casket surrounded by flowers and items in the colour purple, her favourite colour, at Roman Catholic Church in Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday at her funeral.

  • After the funeral for Tina Fontaine Saturday in Sagkeeng First Nation her grandmother, Thelma Favel, sat at the grave site of Tina's father, Eugene Robert Fontaine. It is the same site where Tina Fontaine will be laid to rest in coming days. Favel broke down into tears while there begging her nephew's forgiveness for the death of Tina.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    After the funeral for Tina Fontaine Saturday in Sagkeeng First Nation her grandmother, Thelma Favel, sat at the grave site of Tina's father, Eugene Robert Fontaine. It is the same site where Tina Fontaine will be laid to rest in coming days. Favel broke down into tears while there begging her nephew's forgiveness for the death of Tina.

  • Family members of Tina Fontaine break down into tears after her body is taken away in a hearse after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Family members of Tina Fontaine break down into tears after her body is taken away in a hearse after her funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation Saturday.

  • Thelma Favel broke down in tears and is comforted by her husband Joseph after her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine, was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation after her funeral Saturday.

    Ruth Bonneville / The Winnipeg Free Press

    Thelma Favel broke down in tears and is comforted by her husband Joseph after her deceased grandniece, Tina Fontaine, was taken away in a hearse at Sagkeeng First Nation after her funeral Saturday.

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