May 28, 2015


Point of View

150th anniversary of Portage and Main

Looking north on Main Street from Portage Avenue, undated. The old city hall building can be seen in the distance.
Portage Avenue and Main Street, seen during the 1919 General Strike.
The view down Portage Avenue at Main Street, 1929.
Main Street looking north from Portage Avenue, undated.
Birthday cake is served up at Portage and Main for Winnipeg's 75th anniversary celebrations in June, 1949.
Portage Avenue and Main Street, looking west down Portage, in 1956.
Portage Avenue and Main Street, November 13, 1958.
Portage Avenue and Main Street, seen on the July 24, 1959 Royal Visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh.
Construction begins in 1967 on the future site of the Richardson Building at Portage and Main.
Construction starts on the Trizec Building (360 Main Street) and the Winnipeg Square underground mall at Portage and Main, February 22, 1977.
City crews begin street pavement reconstruction in the Portage Avenue and Main Street area, May 30, 1978. Work included putting in new pavement, replacing existing sidewalks with interlocking paving stone walks and upgrading street lighting on Main Street from Graham Avenue to Lombard Avenue and on Portage Avenue from Fort Street to about 150 feet east of Main.
City crews begin street pavement reconstruction in the Portage Avenue and Main Street area, May 30, 1978. Work included putting in new pavement, replacing existing sidewalks with interlocking paving stone walks and upgrading street lighting on Main Street from Graham Avenue to Lombard Avenue and on Portage Avenue from Fort Street to about 150 feet east of Main.
Champagne was the order of the day as Trizec Equities Limited marked the
Looking north on Main Street from Portage Avenue, undated. The old city hall building can be seen in the distance. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Portage Avenue and Main Street, seen during the 1919 General Strike. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
The view down Portage Avenue at Main Street, 1929. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Main Street looking north from Portage Avenue, undated. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Birthday cake is served up at Portage and Main for Winnipeg's 75th anniversary celebrations in June, 1949. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Portage Avenue and Main Street, looking west down Portage, in 1956. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Portage Avenue and Main Street, November 13, 1958. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Portage Avenue and Main Street, seen on the July 24, 1959 Royal Visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Construction begins in 1967 on the future site of the Richardson Building at Portage and Main. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Construction starts on the Trizec Building (360 Main Street) and the Winnipeg Square underground mall at Portage and Main, February 22, 1977. - Winnipeg Free Press Archives
City crews begin street pavement reconstruction in the Portage Avenue and Main Street area, May 30, 1978. Work included putting in new pavement, replacing existing sidewalks with interlocking paving stone walks and upgrading street lighting on Main Street from Graham Avenue to Lombard Avenue and on Portage Avenue from Fort Street to about 150 feet east of Main. - Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press Archives
City crews begin street pavement reconstruction in the Portage Avenue and Main Street area, May 30, 1978. Work included putting in new pavement, replacing existing sidewalks with interlocking paving stone walks and upgrading street lighting on Main Street from Graham Avenue to Lombard Avenue and on Portage Avenue from Fort Street to about 150 feet east of Main. - Wayne Glowacki / Winnipeg Free Press Archives
Champagne was the order of the day as Trizec Equities Limited marked the "topping off" of the initial phase of Winnipeg Square at Portage and Main, October 24, 1979. To celebrate, construction workers were treated to champagne by a company official, although the view from the top of 31 storeys might have been enough to make some heads swim. The ceremony marked the pouring of the last hopper of concrete on the city's then-tallest building. - Gerry Cairns / Winnipeg Free Press Archives

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