• Zellers (February 12, 2013) / Target (March 23, 2015)
  • The lights of the aurora borealis over Lake Winnipeg at Victoria Beach late at night on March 18th. A geomagnetic storm sent solar rays soaring into the Earth's atmosphere, leading to significant northern lights activity that was visible across much of North America March 18 and 19th. (Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press)
  • (Front to back) Risa Shatford, Nadia Minkevich, and Wayne Shatford head into the lake to cool off at Lake of the Woods. July 27, 2014
  • Palestinian supporters hold a rally at the Manitoba Legislative Building. July 14, 2014.

This image is from a rally against the Israel bombing of Gaza. It reminds me of the freedom we still have in this country to gather freely, unlike those who live under unjust regimes and occupation. — John Woods
  • As a photojournalist, our job is to take pictures that tell stories.  If those photos evoke emotion in the viewer, then better yet.  The photo that moves me the most this past year is that of Bradley Bone, the 16-year-old pall bearer at Tina Fontaine's funeral who stepped outside his comfort zone to give her one last hug goodbye. On Aug. 23, I attended Tina Fontaine's funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation. After the formal service was over, the six pallbearers, all cousins of Tina, had gathered around her casket quietly, waiting for the hearse to arrive. Bradley Bone, one of the pallbearers, referred to Tina as his 'little sister.'  I had asked the family ahead of time if I could photograph Tina's final journey and they agreed. It was during this time of waiting that Bradley, unable to hold back his emotions any longer, made a bold move to say goodbye in his own way to Tina by wrapping his arms around her coffin and laying his body across its case. It was an impromptu show of affection that happened so quickly, I barely caught a few frames on my camera. There wasn't any time to analyze my position, check the lighting, or even crop the photo. The heartfelt display of emotion was quick, raw and fleeting; I couldn't risk missing it by moving. As the family could not have an open casket funeral due to her being pulled from the damaging waters of the Red River and the monstrous crime committed against her, the closest Bradley could get to her to say goodbye, one last time, was to hug her casket. This image to me is symbolic, for as this teenage boy wrapped his arms around his little cousin one last time, so too has a nation wrapped their arms around the issue of murdered and missing aboriginal women in our nation.  - Ruth Bonneville

Images from around the world chosen by the photo desk at the Winnipeg Free Press.

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    20 Total Pictures

  • June 15, 2013

    1979 Manitoba Marathon

    The shorts were shorter, and the hair was longer. Even the route was different. But 35 years ago, a tradition began and has held strong for thousands of runners looking for their personal bests. Here are some images of the first Manitoba Marathon held June 16, 1979.

    • Print
  • Runners can still smile at the start of the race.

    Runners can still smile at the start of the race.   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • Pounding the pavement on the Trans-Canada highway.

    Pounding the pavement on the Trans-Canada highway.   (Paul Deleske/Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • The route as of 1979.

    The route as of 1979. Photo Store

  • Fashionable runners never go out of style.

    Fashionable runners never go out of style.   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • Front runners in Headingley.

    Front runners in Headingley.   (James Haggarty/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • Hosing off.

    Hosing off. Photo Store

  • An exhausted runner is helped to the sidelines.

    An exhausted runner is helped to the sidelines.   (Wayne Glowacki/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  •   (Wayne Glowacki/Winnipeg Free Press )

  • Joint finish.

    Joint finish.   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • Gail Volk of Seattle was the first female to finish.

    Gail Volk of Seattle was the first female to finish.   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • A marathon for all ages.

    A marathon for all ages.   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • The cool down.

    The cool down.   (James Haggarty/Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • Runner who collapsed at finish line is wheeled away.

    Runner who collapsed at finish line is wheeled away.   (Wayne Glowacki/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

  • "Retcher's Row." Runners collapse after finishing.   (James Haggarty/Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • Pat Vogt watches and waits for husband Duke at the finish line area.

    Pat Vogt watches and waits for husband Duke at the finish line area.   (James Haggarty/Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  •   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press )

  • Finished at the finish line.

    Finished at the finish line.   (Ken Gigliotti/Winnipeg Free Press ) Photo Store

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