September 1, 2015


Point of View

Aerial flight over Ochre Beach Ice Shove

Looking out over Dauphin Lake the thawing ice still floats on the lake, and the shore where the ice shove destroyed homes can be seen in the foreground.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
The shore of Dauphin Lake happened to meet the requirements for an ice shove, an unusual event bot not completely unknown.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Over the past two months, ice shoves have also destroyed or threatened property in Lake Mille Lacs, Minn., Lake Winnebago, Wis., Alberta Beach, Alta., and Lake Champlain, N.Y.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Specific factors must be in place for an ice shove. First, ice floating on a large body of water that's in the process of thawing. While solid sheets won't move, any form of free-floating ice -- large blocks or smaller shards -- can be pushed around by wind.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
When the wind is strong enough and blows long enough to push that ice in one direction, it can become an ice shove when it hits the shore. The leading edge of this mass of ice will stop, forcing the trailing ice to pile up on top of it.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Given enough momentum, the resulting pile can surge onto the shore.
Premier Greg Selinger toured the smashed homes and cottages at Ochre Beach Monday morning and declared victims will qualify for disaster financial assistance.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Looking out over Dauphin Lake the thawing ice still floats on the lake, and the shore where the ice shove destroyed homes can be seen in the foreground. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
The shore of Dauphin Lake happened to meet the requirements for an ice shove, an unusual event bot not completely unknown. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Over the past two months, ice shoves have also destroyed or threatened property in Lake Mille Lacs, Minn., Lake Winnebago, Wis., Alberta Beach, Alta., and Lake Champlain, N.Y. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Specific factors must be in place for an ice shove. First, ice floating on a large body of water that's in the process of thawing. While solid sheets won't move, any form of free-floating ice -- large blocks or smaller shards -- can be pushed around by wind. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
When the wind is strong enough and blows long enough to push that ice in one direction, it can become an ice shove when it hits the shore. The leading edge of this mass of ice will stop, forcing the trailing ice to pile up on top of it. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Given enough momentum, the resulting pile can surge onto the shore. "It's like a freight train, and you have all these cars at the back end with nowhere to go," said Jay Doering, a University of Manitoba civil engineering professor. "Some have even referred to it as an ice tsunami." (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)
Premier Greg Selinger toured the smashed homes and cottages at Ochre Beach Monday morning and declared victims will qualify for disaster financial assistance. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

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