• (Front to back) Risa Shatford, Nadia Minkevich, and Wayne Shatford head into the lake to cool off at Lake of the Woods. July 27, 2014
  • Palestinian supporters hold a rally at the Manitoba Legislative Building. July 14, 2014.

This image is from a rally against the Israel bombing of Gaza. It reminds me of the freedom we still have in this country to gather freely, unlike those who live under unjust regimes and occupation. — John Woods
  • As a photojournalist, our job is to take pictures that tell stories.  If those photos evoke emotion in the viewer, then better yet.  The photo that moves me the most this past year is that of Bradley Bone, the 16-year-old pall bearer at Tina Fontaine's funeral who stepped outside his comfort zone to give her one last hug goodbye. On Aug. 23, I attended Tina Fontaine's funeral in Sagkeeng First Nation. After the formal service was over, the six pallbearers, all cousins of Tina, had gathered around her casket quietly, waiting for the hearse to arrive. Bradley Bone, one of the pallbearers, referred to Tina as his 'little sister.'  I had asked the family ahead of time if I could photograph Tina's final journey and they agreed. It was during this time of waiting that Bradley, unable to hold back his emotions any longer, made a bold move to say goodbye in his own way to Tina by wrapping his arms around her coffin and laying his body across its case. It was an impromptu show of affection that happened so quickly, I barely caught a few frames on my camera. There wasn't any time to analyze my position, check the lighting, or even crop the photo. The heartfelt display of emotion was quick, raw and fleeting; I couldn't risk missing it by moving. As the family could not have an open casket funeral due to her being pulled from the damaging waters of the Red River and the monstrous crime committed against her, the closest Bradley could get to her to say goodbye, one last time, was to hug her casket. This image to me is symbolic, for as this teenage boy wrapped his arms around his little cousin one last time, so too has a nation wrapped their arms around the issue of murdered and missing aboriginal women in our nation.  - Ruth Bonneville
  • In April 2014 I followed exotic dancer Aurora Sky at work and at home with her two young boys. To document her life dancing in the nude in various bars around Winnipeg I photographed one performance where I had permission, and behind the scenes with her family. This was my favourite photo, captured while Aurora was getting ready in a small hotel room designated for dancers competing in the Miss Nude Winnipeg Contest at Teasers Burlesque palace.
  • Lana Fontaine, an Aunt of Tina Fontaine, weeps at a memorial shrine built on the bank of the Red River where her niece's body was recovered. August 19, 2014

Images from around the world chosen by the photo desk at the Winnipeg Free Press.

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  • May 14, 2013

    Aerial flight over Ochre Beach Ice Shove

    The phenomenon known as an ice shove damaged and destroyed 27 properties on the southern shore of Dauphin Lake at Ochre Beach. Described by some as an 'ice tsunami,' Ice Shoves have also recently destroyed or threatened property in Lake Mille Lacs, Minn., Lake Winnebago, Wis., Alberta Beach, Alta., and Lake Champlain, N.Y. These aerial photographs were taken three days after event. --Files from Bartley Kives and Larry Kusch.

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  • Looking out over Dauphin Lake the thawing ice still floats on the lake, and the shore where the ice shove destroyed homes can be seen in the foreground.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

    Looking out over Dauphin Lake the thawing ice still floats on the lake, and the shore where the ice shove destroyed homes can be seen in the foreground. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • The shore of Dauphin Lake happened to meet the requirements for an ice shove, an unusual event bot not completely unknown.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

    The shore of Dauphin Lake happened to meet the requirements for an ice shove, an unusual event bot not completely unknown. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • Over the past two months, ice shoves have also destroyed or threatened property in Lake Mille Lacs, Minn., Lake Winnebago, Wis., Alberta Beach, Alta., and Lake Champlain, N.Y.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

    Over the past two months, ice shoves have also destroyed or threatened property in Lake Mille Lacs, Minn., Lake Winnebago, Wis., Alberta Beach, Alta., and Lake Champlain, N.Y. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • Specific factors must be in place for an ice shove. First, ice floating on a large body of water that's in the process of thawing. While solid sheets won't move, any form of free-floating ice -- large blocks or smaller shards -- can be pushed around by wind.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

    Specific factors must be in place for an ice shove. First, ice floating on a large body of water that's in the process of thawing. While solid sheets won't move, any form of free-floating ice -- large blocks or smaller shards -- can be pushed around by wind. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • When the wind is strong enough and blows long enough to push that ice in one direction, it can become an ice shove when it hits the shore. The leading edge of this mass of ice will stop, forcing the trailing ice to pile up on top of it.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

    When the wind is strong enough and blows long enough to push that ice in one direction, it can become an ice shove when it hits the shore. The leading edge of this mass of ice will stop, forcing the trailing ice to pile up on top of it. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • Given enough momentum, the resulting pile can surge onto the shore.

    Given enough momentum, the resulting pile can surge onto the shore. "It's like a freight train, and you have all these cars at the back end with nowhere to go," said Jay Doering, a University of Manitoba civil engineering professor. "Some have even referred to it as an ice tsunami." (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

  • Premier Greg Selinger toured the smashed homes and cottages at Ochre Beach Monday morning and declared victims will qualify for disaster financial assistance.
(Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press)

    Premier Greg Selinger toured the smashed homes and cottages at Ochre Beach Monday morning and declared victims will qualify for disaster financial assistance. (Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press) Photo Store

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