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End bullying, reach out and talk

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Tad Milmine is a man on a mission to wipe out bullying. The RCMP officer visited Winnipeg on his holidays to talk to students about how bullying affected his life.

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Tad Milmine is a man on a mission to wipe out bullying. The RCMP officer visited Winnipeg on his holidays to talk to students about how bullying affected his life.

About a month ago I was fortunate to have been given an assignment to head over to Grant Park High School to take photos at a school assembly where RCMP Const. Tad Milmine was speaking to a few hundred students.

He was there to talk about bullying and how it affected his life.

In the original story, reporter Nick Martin, posits right off the top, "Was it a seminal moment in a student's young life?"

Const. Milmine's story was so intriguing, I wish every child in Winnipeg could have been in that room. It was such a great emotional speech, I could tell that it really did affect many of the students.

After his talk I patiently waited while a line of students thanked him, several of whom I could tell from a distance really wished to open up to him. I hope they did.

I asked him a couple questions.

Basically, boil your hour-long talk down to one sentence, what advice would you give to a large group?

"If there is something going on in your life, that you're having any type of challenge, dealing with on your own, It's imperative that you reach out and you share what's going on. You give an adult or someone trusted in your life a chance to help."

What do you think is the hardest part about initiating that communication?

"The first sit down of ‘I want to talk.' That's the hardest, because so often youth are thinking that they have to have an agenda, that they need to have an entire itinerary of where they are going. They don't understand a school councilor is trained to know what questions to ask, what to bring up.

"If you just simply say, ‘I want to talk to you,' That's the hardest part, but my goodness as soon as you get those words out you are going to feel like a million dollars. You will recognize that communicating in any way does help."

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About Mike Deal

After freelancing for the Winnipeg Free Press for three years, starting in 1997, Mike Deal landed a part-time job as a night photodesk editor.

His first day in the new position was supposed to be September 12, 2001. But when he woke to the news of the two towers on September 11, he automatically headed into the newsroom.

For the next few years, he split his hours at the Winnipeg Free Press between photo editing and photography. In 2008, Mike was hired full-time as a photojournalist.

Mike’s training includes a journalism diploma from the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in Calgary. He also spent time at the University of Manitoba, working at the Manitoban and the U of M photo club and taking fine art courses.

Having also just finished shooting a personal project that involved taking 2,013 portraits using just his iPhone in the year 2013, he looks forward to taking the portrait project concept to another level. He will NOT be shooting 2,014 in 2014! Don't be surprised if he stops you in the street and demands a moment of your time. You have been warned!

Another personal passion of his is street photography, capturing the people of Winnipeg amongst the beautiful architecture of its downtown.

In his off-hours Mike enjoys taking photos with his iPhone, walks in Assiniboine Forest, and spending his free time with his partner Ariel and daughter Anna.

 

"I go to the street for the education of my eye and for the sustenance that the eye needs - the hungry eye, and my eye is hungry."    -Walker Evans

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