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Don't you forget about me (Hugh). Don't don't don't you....

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Some political stories are so good, they seem made up. Too good to be true. I don't know if this falls into that category, but it's worth a giggle....Did you know that Tory Leader Hugh McFadyen, and NDP MLAs Andrew Swan and Sharon Blady all went to high school together and graduated in the same class of 1985? All are alumni of Silver Heights Collegiate and all were in attendance a week ago when SHs celebrated its 50th anniversary with a big reunion. Now, they are facing off against each other in the Manitoba Legislature.It occurred to me that all three graduated highschool the year The Breakfast Club hit movie theatres. I wonder, if McFadyen, Swan and Blady were members of the infamous Breakfast Club, which characters would they play?Perhaps McFadyen would play the role of Andy Clark, the hapless jock with a heart of gold portrayed by Emilio Estevez. That is, unless he wants to admit to a darker, brooding, anti-establishment side that would allow him to play Judd Nelson's character, the aptly named John Bender. I'm reasonably confident that Andrew Swan is a good fit for Anthony Michael Hall's bookish good guy, Brian Johnson.The tough one is Blady. A relative newcomer to politics, we don't know as much about her as we do the other two. She could take on the role of Claire Standish, the iconic rich-girl-trying-to-piss-off-her-father-by-dating-the-bad-boy cream puff burned into our memories by Molly Ringwald. Of course, if she was more dark cloud than ray of sunshine in her high school days, she could be the black-draped, dandruff-ravaged Allison Reynolds who was portrayed with understated charm by Ally Sheedy.Thank god they graduated in 1985. If they graduated in 1986, I'd be trying to match the politicians with the characters in Pretty In Pink.

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About Dan Lett

Dan Lett came to Winnipeg in 1986, less than a year out of journalism school.

Despite the fact that he’s originally from Toronto and has a fatal attraction to the Maple Leafs, Winnipeggers let him stay.

In the following years, he has worked at bureaus covering every level of government – from city hall to the national bureau in Ottawa.

He has had bricks thrown at him in riots following the 1995 Quebec referendum, wrote stories that helped in part to free three wrongly convicted men, met Fidel Castro, interviewed three Philippine presidents, crossed several borders in Africa illegally, chased Somali pirates in a Canadian warship and had several guns pointed at him.

In other words, he’s had every experience a journalist could even hope for. He has also been fortunate enough to be a two-time nominee for a National Newspaper Award, winning in 2003 for investigations.

Other awards include the B’Nai Brith National Human Rights Media Award and nominee for the Michener Award for Meritorious Public Service in Journalism.

Now firmly rooted in Winnipeg, Dan visits Toronto often but no longer pines to live there.

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