Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

One hundred years from now, what will people think about...

  • Print
This comment from a reader, sent to various reporters and editors from the Free Press:"I am an active participant in my son’s daycare and recently received the results of a survey that outraged me! This survey stated that a person could make more money at McDonalds, Domo or Tim Horton’s than they could caring for and teaching my child in a daycare center. We’re talking about molding children into respectable, functioning, educated citizens and daycare is the first step to that. Early childhood education is HUGE! Who do we want the next generation to be? How can they become all they can when the Early Childcare industry is not attracting many people and those that do decide on that route, many leave quite quickly when faced with all the responsibility and low pay."As it's tax time, it's a reminder of the Conservative government's efforts to reform daycare. I will be accused of grossly simplifying the program, but in essence the Tories opted to give every family in the country $100 a month, $1,200 a year, to support whatever form of child care they wanted. So, if you chose to stay at home and care for your children, you get $100 a month. If you dolled out for child care, you got $100 a month.I acknowledge it's an issue on which opinions vary wildly. There are traditionalists who believe only a parent can provide child care and that daycare causes everything from ADD to sociopathic tendancies. There are more modern views that claim ECE prepares children better for school, while allowing men and women to pursue careers that make them more complete, fulfilled and happier taxpayers. There is also a strong argument to be made that our modern economy needs dual income families to fill important jobs and to contribute tax dollars to support our rapidly aging population.The reader's comments above raise an interesting question: Would a majority of Canadians support paying $100 a month to stay-at-home parents or using that money to improve the wages of Early Childhood Educators? Your comments are most welcome at this point.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

About Dan Lett

Dan Lett came to Winnipeg in 1986, less than a year out of journalism school.

Despite the fact that he’s originally from Toronto and has a fatal attraction to the Maple Leafs, Winnipeggers let him stay.

In the following years, he has worked at bureaus covering every level of government – from city hall to the national bureau in Ottawa.

He has had bricks thrown at him in riots following the 1995 Quebec referendum, wrote stories that helped in part to free three wrongly convicted men, met Fidel Castro, interviewed three Philippine presidents, crossed several borders in Africa illegally, chased Somali pirates in a Canadian warship and had several guns pointed at him.

In other words, he’s had every experience a journalist could even hope for. He has also been fortunate enough to be a two-time nominee for a National Newspaper Award, winning in 2003 for investigations.

Other awards include the B’Nai Brith National Human Rights Media Award and nominee for the Michener Award for Meritorious Public Service in Journalism.

Now firmly rooted in Winnipeg, Dan visits Toronto often but no longer pines to live there.

Twitter

Ads by Google