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Questions du jour

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Today is one of those days when all I have is questions, no answers. In no particular order:Doesn't the exclusion of Michigan and Florida delegates from the Democratic presidential nomination process create the possibility of an illegitimate result? Both states held primaries before the official start of primary season, against party edict. As a result, Barack Obama did not campaign in either state, and took his name off the ballot in Michigan. Hillary Clinton won both, of course, and now wants the results counted or a re-vote. I know those two states broke the rules, and perhaps as some have argued it wouldn't have stopped the Obama train from pulling into Denver as the rightful nominee, but it just doesn't feel right.*****I'm not a fan of inflation, but isn't there something hopeful about the fact that astronomical energy and base metal prices have pushed the price of bullets through the roof? Perhaps, just maybe, if bullets get to be too expensive, gun nuts will turn to a less harmful hobby like raising rabbits or racing tractors. Fewer gun nuts means fewer guns means fewer guns being stolen to fuel the illegal gun market in the U.S. and Canada. Tallyho.*****Why, oh why, have western nations become so ambivalent about having their children immunized? Ontario's Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences reports that only 66.5% of two-year olds in that province have been fully immunized. Public health experts in this country have been hard pressed to explain this phenomenon, which has seen declining immunization rates for many years. Fear of adverse reactions is certainly part of the equation, fueled by an ill-informed, paranoid and dangerous anit-immunization movement. Perhaps not surprisingly, the Ontario study found immigrant families had a better record of immunizing their children (69%). It's not surprising because many of those people came from countries where access to immunizations is considered a human rights issue. Perhaps those parents who deliberately avoid immunizing their children should live for a year in a developing country. Just to test their resolve.As usual, your answers to any of these questions are most welcome.-30-

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About Dan Lett

Dan Lett came to Winnipeg in 1986, less than a year out of journalism school.

Despite the fact that he’s originally from Toronto and has a fatal attraction to the Maple Leafs, Winnipeggers let him stay.

In the following years, he has worked at bureaus covering every level of government – from city hall to the national bureau in Ottawa.

He has had bricks thrown at him in riots following the 1995 Quebec referendum, wrote stories that helped in part to free three wrongly convicted men, met Fidel Castro, interviewed three Philippine presidents, crossed several borders in Africa illegally, chased Somali pirates in a Canadian warship and had several guns pointed at him.

In other words, he’s had every experience a journalist could even hope for. He has also been fortunate enough to be a two-time nominee for a National Newspaper Award, winning in 2003 for investigations.

Other awards include the B’Nai Brith National Human Rights Media Award and nominee for the Michener Award for Meritorious Public Service in Journalism.

Now firmly rooted in Winnipeg, Dan visits Toronto often but no longer pines to live there.

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