Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

It could be worse...

  • Print

I see by Academica Top Ten that the U of Alberta now has to chop $56 million out of its budget over two years, rather than three, because of severe cuts to provincial funding.

The item in the on-line postsecondary news roundup, originally reported in the Edmonton Journal and Globe and Mail, says that UA has to reduce the budget by seven per cent and student support services by eight per cent for 2014-2015.

Here in Manitoba, the province reneged on its five per cent grants increase promise, but still increased grants by 2.5 per cent, avoiding so far the massive reductions seen in Alberta and several other provinces.

Meanwhile, some U.S. schools on whose mailing lists I have somehow managed to land are taking extraordinary steps to make postsecondary education accessible for students.

Take, for instance, Ashland University, which is a private university somewhere between Cleveland and Akron, which announced breathlessly:

"Ashland University has made a bold move in addressing the issues of accessibility and affordability facing higher education. The University has reset its cost structure for full-time undergraduate tuition and financial aid resulting in a cost cut of more than $10,000 for the 2014-15 academic year. The tuition reset, which will apply to all full-time undergraduate students enrolled in 2014-15, represents a 37 per cent decrease from the projected 2014-15 tuition of $30,064, bringing it to $18,908.

"‘Over the past decade everyone in higher education has danced around the subject of the rising cost of college. Yet few have been willing to tackle the issue and the complications involved,’ said AU President Dr. Fred Finks. ‘Ashland University knows the importance of positioning ourselves to meet the rising demand for quality education at an affordable price. We have decided now is the time to act. We believe this is the best way for us to help both the ‘high-need’ and the ‘low-need’ students.’"

Ashland officials said in the news release that some students and parents were deterred by sticker shock — can’t imagine why — and that the new fees will be introduced concurrently with a reduction in scholarships and other financial assistance, so that students will be charged what would be close to their bottom line cost of attending. Plus, one should add, $9,502 for ancillary fees and room and board.

One year’s tuition at Ashland would give a student four years in an honours program at UM and UW, with money left over for books.

It’s not just health care you need to deal with, Barack.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

About Nick Martin

Nick Martin is the old bearded guy at the back of the newsroom, the most experienced reporter at the Winnipeg Free Press, having started his career in Ontario in 1971.

He’s been covering education for the Free Press since the spring of 1997, after decades primarily covering municipal politics, including a four-year stint at the Ontario legislature for the London Free Press.

Nick moved to Manitoba in 1988 with his Winnipeg-born wife, who is a professor at the University of Manitoba. They have two kids, both of whom graduated from Grant Park High School: son Chris and daughter Gillian.

Nick has won a national journalism award from the Canadian Association of University Teachers, two Manitoba Human Rights Journalism awards, and the Ontario Reporters Association investigative award.

Nick is a long-distance runner, having finished and survived 18 marathons and 15 half-marathons and 30-kilometre races, and having (barely) survived 10 years as an outdoor and indoor soccer coach.

Nick became a soccer referee in 2007, delighting in his 60s in outrunning 16-year-olds and keeping his distance from obstreperous coaches and parents.

Nick and his wife have discovered a mutual love for kayaking at their Whiteshell cottage, and are both regulars at the Reh-Fit Centre. They hold season tickets to both the Manitoba Theatre Centre and the Warehouse, and as empty nesters, have rediscovered the joys of an active winter vacation.

A native of Jarrow-on-Tyne, England, Nick is a member of the Toon Army as a Newcastle United supporter, and a proud citizen of Leafs Nation.

Ads by Google