Were you surprised to hear Saskatchewan farmer turned convicted killer Robert Latimer was denied day parole Wednesday?I was." /> Were you surprised to hear Saskatchewan farmer turned convicted killer Robert Latimer was denied day parole Wednesday?I was." /> Robert Latimer - Winnipeg Free Press

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Robert Latimer

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450_cp_latimer_071205[1].jpg Were you surprised to hear Saskatchewan farmer turned convicted killer Robert Latimer was denied day parole Wednesday?I was.I figured the time Latimer has spent in prison - he's been behind bars since January 2001 - would be enough to satisfy a parole board that often seems to release offenders at the earliest opportunity.How often have we heard of violent, repeat offenders walking the streets within a heartbeat of being sent to the slammer?However, Latimer did something Wednesday that spelled doom for his immediate chances of release.He refused to say "I'm sorry".Latimer still believes he did the right thing in killing his severely disabled daughter, Tracy, and wasn't afraid to tell that to the parole board."It was a very personal thing and wasn’t a big guilt trip. I still don’t feel guilty now," Latimer said.This is a hot-button case which has clearly divided Canadians. Some people he is a cold-blooded killer who should be locked away for a very long time. Others maintain he shouldn't have served a single day for what he did.Latimer will likely get out one day - his next parole bid can be in two years - but the debate will likely rage on for much longer.I'd like to know where you stand, especially on the issue of whether he should have been granted parole.By late Wednesday night, more than 80 per cent of voters on my latest website jury poll - click HERE to vote - felt Latimer should have released.Post your thoughts below.

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About Mike McIntyre

Journalist, national radio show host, author, pundit and cruise director ... Mike McIntyre loves to keep busy.

Mike is the justice reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press, where he has worked since 1997. He produces and hosts the weekly talk radio show Crime and Punishment, which runs on the Corus Radio Network in several Canadian cities.

Born and bred in Winnipeg, Mike graduated from River East Collegiate and completed his journalism studies in the Creative Communications program at Red River College.

He and his wife, Chassity, have two children.

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