Wilful blindness - it's a term we don't often hear in the justice system." /> Wilful blindness - it's a term we don't often hear in the justice system." /> Doped or duped? - Winnipeg Free Press

Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Doped or duped?

  • Print
marijuana-mar-com-1[1].jpg Wilful blindness - it's a term we don't often hear in the justice system.But five Chinese migrants are hoping it won't be their ticket to a criminal conviction.The group - along with 23 others yet to go on trial - were busted in October 2005 inside a massive Manitoba marijuana grow operation in which police seized an estimated $19 million (street value) in pot.While the alleged mastermind was somehow able to sneak out of Canada and has never been arrested, the down-and-out labourers who were pulled off the streets of Toronto with the promise of some quick, easy cash are left to face the legal music.Mike Cook, the lawyer representing the five who went on trial this week, claims his clients should be found not guilty because they didn't know what they were getting into. (Read story HERE)The Crown doesn't buy their excuse, arguing these accused must have realized they were being pulled into an illegal enterprise.And if the promise of up to $300 a day didn't do it, what they saw upon arrival in rural Manitoba surely must have, the Crown says.All five accused have now testified in their own defence - through translators - and are sticking to their stories that they were innocent dupes.Some thought they were on a fruit and vegetable farm. Another man believed he was harvesting "Chinese medicinal herbs".It's an interesting case. With an even more interesting defence. We may have a verdict by the end of the week.In the meantime, what do you think? Guilty or not guilty? And are you, like some folks who have written to me, ticked that police poured so many resources into a marijuana operation? Or was this money well spent?

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

About Mike McIntyre

Journalist, national radio show host, author, pundit and cruise director ... Mike McIntyre loves to keep busy.

Mike is the justice reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press, where he has worked since 1997. He produces and hosts the weekly talk radio show Crime and Punishment, which runs on the Corus Radio Network in several Canadian cities.

Born and bred in Winnipeg, Mike graduated from River East Collegiate and completed his journalism studies in the Creative Communications program at Red River College.

He and his wife, Chassity, have two children.

Twitter

Ads by Google