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Did school go too far to make a point with students?

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Fascinating story came across the news wire today.I've always been an advocate of trying something different, something unique, to get a message across - especially when it's clear traditional methods aren't working.And as I've written before in this space, I'll never understand why some people just snub their noses at the risks associated with drinking driving.That being said, I'm not sure how I feel about the following. Should we be cheering school officials for "thinking outside the box" - or did they cross the proverbial line with their approach?Have a read, and post your thoughts below. We'll discuss this on my national radio show Sunday evening.OCEANSIDE, California (AP) — On a Monday morning last month, highway patrol officers visited 20 classrooms at El Camino High School to announce some horrible news: Several students had been killed in car wrecks over the weekend.Classmates wept. Some became hysterical.A few hours and many tears later, though, the pain turned to fury when the teenagers learned that it was all a hoax, a scared-straight exercise designed by school officials to dramatize the consequences of drinking and driving.As seniors prepare for graduation parties Friday, school officials in the largely prosperous San Diego, California, suburb are defending themselves against allegations that they went too far.At school assemblies, some students held posters that read, “Death is real. Don’t play with our emotions.”Michelle de Gracia, 16, was in physics class when an officer announced that her missing classmate David, a popular basketball player, had died instantly after being rear-ended by a drunken driver. She said she felt nauseated but was too stunned to cry.“They got the shock they wanted,” she said.Some of her classmates became extremely upset, prompting the teacher to tell them immediately that it was all staged.“People started yelling at the teacher,” she said. “It was pretty hectic.”Others, including many who heard the news of the 26 deaths between classes, were left in the dark until the missing students reappeared hours later.“You feel betrayed by your teachers and administrators, these people you trust,” said 15-year-old Carolyn Magos. “But then I felt selfish for feeling that way, because, I mean, if it saves one life, it’s worth it.”Officials at the 3,100-student school defended the program.“They were traumatized, but we wanted them to be traumatized,” said guidance counselor Lori Tauber, who helped organize the shocking exercise and got dozens of students to participate. “That’s how they get the message.”The plan was to tell the truth to the students at an assembly later in the day. But word that it was all a hoax began to spread before the gathering. Tauber said some counselors and administrators revealed the truth to calm some students who had become upset.Oceanside Schools Superintendent Larry Perondi said he fielded only a few calls from parents, and the PTA chapter said it had not heard any complaints. Perondi said the program would be revised, but he would not say how. And he said he was glad that students seemed to have gotten the message.“We did this in earnest,” he said. “This was not done to be a prankster.” www.mikeoncrime.com

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About Mike McIntyre

Journalist, national radio show host, author, pundit and cruise director ... Mike McIntyre loves to keep busy.

Mike is the justice reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press, where he has worked since 1997. He produces and hosts the weekly talk radio show Crime and Punishment, which runs on the Corus Radio Network in several Canadian cities.

Born and bred in Winnipeg, Mike graduated from River East Collegiate and completed his journalism studies in the Creative Communications program at Red River College.

He and his wife, Chassity, have two children.

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