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Money Money Money

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Canada’s new plastic money is coming!

If you’re like me and tend not to carry very many $100s or $50s you might not see them for awhile. The $100 polymer bill will be the first one released, coming out in November. The $50 bill will next, arriving in March 2012. But the $20, $10 and $5 polymer bills will all come into circulation by the end of 2013.

Plastic money will last 2.5 times longer than the current cotton bills in circulation so while they cost more to make, they actually will be $200 million cheaper in the long run and better for the environment, says the Bank of Canada.

They are also supposed to be harder to counterfeit.

Don’t worry about losing our monopoly-money reputation with Americans because the new bills will retain similar colours to the existing bills. So that $5 bill will stay blue and the $20s will still be green. They will also retain features to help visually-impaired people determine the denomination at hand.

The Bank of Canada has created a series of web videos about the whole process of making the new money. They’re not exactly Academy Award-winning material but if you’re interested at all in how our money is made, they have some interesting facts. The videos kind of remind me of the segments on kids’ shows I used to watch where Mr. Rogers or Mr. Dress Up or someone would take us behind the scenes in a factory to show us how bread is made or where socks come from.

 

-- Mia Rabson / The Capital Chronicles

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About Mia Rabson

Mia Rabson is a born and bred Winnipegger whose interest in politics seemed clear when she dressed up as Prime Minister Brian Mulroney for Halloween in the 7th grade.

Her interest in writing was no surprise to her parents, who learned early in Mia’s life that no piece of blank paper — or wall, for that matter — was safe in her hands.

She holds an honours BA in English from Queen’s University, a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario, and has completed a political journalism fellowship in Washington, D.C. with the Washington Centre for Politics and Journalism.

Prior to working for the Winnipeg Free Press, Mia briefly worked for the Detroit News in the paper’s Washington bureau.

Mia joined the Free Press team in February 2001, and in April 2001 was appointed to the Manitoba legislature bureau. In December 2004, she was appointed bureau chief at the legislature. She became the newspaper’s parliamentary bureau chief/national reporter in Ottawa in January 2008.

In 2008 she was nominated for a Michener Award with a team of reporters from the Free Press for its coverage of the province’s child welfare system.

She counts reliving the invasion at Dieppe, France, with veterans of the failed Second World War expedition and overcoming her fear of heights to touch the Golden Boy statue atop the Legislative Building among her favourite experiences as a reporter.

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