Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Taxing matters

  • Print

The HST debate in Manitoba has subsided for the moment with Premier Greg Selinger (sorry – still not used to that one) and Finance Minister Rosann Wowchuk (nope, not used to that one yet either) ruling it out. Well at least for now.

But the harmonized sales tax is still bubbling fairly loudly on Parliament Hill and I’d wager a bet, it’s one of the more top-of-mind issues in B.C. and Ontario right now. At Queen’s Park in Toronto, two Conservative MPs refused to leave the chamber for two days in protest of the lack of consultation they say was associated with the new tax.

The Ottawa Citizen has been running a special series on the topic the last few days, explaining it’s impetus, it’s impact and the political ramifications.

One thing stood out to me.

A poll found 74 per cent of Ontarians and British Columbians are against the idea of an HST. They see it as a cash grab. Yet economists on both sides of the political spectrum believe it is a good thing. An analysis by University of Calgary economist Jack Mintz is highly touted by Premier Dalton McGuinty as it suggests the HST will help create 591,000 jobs over the next decade and help push annual incomes up 8.8 per cent.

The downside of it is that while businesses pay less, consumers will pay more. And although income tax cuts and one-time cash offset payments from the government are being offered, consumers are still going to feel a pinch.

It brings me to an interesting plight of politics. Sometimes the right thing to do is not the popular thing to do. Businesses don’t vote. People do. There will be some business owners who are thrilled with this, but the vast majority of voters aren’t business owners. They’re people who will suddenly find it is costing eight per cent more to keep your house warm in the winter, fill the car with gasoline or get a haircut.

It obviously remains to be seen whether Ontario and B.C. consumers will cut back on their spending because of the HST next year, or whether it truly will deliver the promised economic rewards.
I will say this.

It is a bold move.

This day and age that is a rare phenomenon.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

About Mia Rabson

Mia Rabson is a born and bred Winnipegger whose interest in politics seemed clear when she dressed up as Prime Minister Brian Mulroney for Halloween in the 7th grade.

Her interest in writing was no surprise to her parents, who learned early in Mia’s life that no piece of blank paper — or wall, for that matter — was safe in her hands.

She holds an honours BA in English from Queen’s University, a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario, and has completed a political journalism fellowship in Washington, D.C. with the Washington Centre for Politics and Journalism.

Prior to working for the Winnipeg Free Press, Mia briefly worked for the Detroit News in the paper’s Washington bureau.

Mia joined the Free Press team in February 2001, and in April 2001 was appointed to the Manitoba legislature bureau. In December 2004, she was appointed bureau chief at the legislature. She became the newspaper’s parliamentary bureau chief/national reporter in Ottawa in January 2008.

In 2008 she was nominated for a Michener Award with a team of reporters from the Free Press for its coverage of the province’s child welfare system.

She counts reliving the invasion at Dieppe, France, with veterans of the failed Second World War expedition and overcoming her fear of heights to touch the Golden Boy statue atop the Legislative Building among her favourite experiences as a reporter.

Twitter

Ads by Google