Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Lake Winnipeg in winter

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A couple of weekends this winter I’ve strapped on my cross-country skis and headed out on Lake Winnipeg.

There’s no groomed trail to follow and the snow is deep in some parts and others it’s just ice, black ice. It's not easy skiing.

Even when it’s cloudy the snow and ice are almost blinding.

I wear snow goggles to protect my eyes from the glare and wind. The noise of my skis and poles make the only sounds.

There’s the odd snowmobiler in the distance, but I’m not alone.

Wild animals big and small criss-cross the lake. Wolf, fox and lynx and whatever else use it to go from wherever they’re coming from to wherever they’re going. Rarely would you see these animals during the busy summer months. In the winter, their tracks are everywhere.

Some spots way out on the lake are littered with fish heads, left by the commercial fishers and picked apart by the ravens and other wild animals. They’ll wash up on the shore this spring after the ice goes.

Looking out on the lake from the shore in the winter, you’d get the impression it’s a frozen wasteland.

Hardly.

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca 

 

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About Larry Kusch and Bruce Owen

Larry Kusch has been a journalist for 30 years, the last 20 with the Winnipeg Free Press. His is one of the newspaper's two legislative bureau reporters.

Raised on a Saskatchewan farm, he received an honours journalism degree from Carleton University in 1975.

At the Free Press, Larry has also worked as a general assignment reporter, business reporter, copy editor and assistant city editor.

Bruce Owen joined the Winnipeg Free Press in 1990 after four years working in other media.

He's worked in a number of positions at the Freep, including pet columnist, assistant city editor and police reporter. Right now he takes up space at the Manitoba legislature.

Bruce is one of five reporters who won a National Newspaper Award for the paper’s coverage of the 1997 Flood of the Century. He's also the recipient of the 1996 Volunteer Centre of Winnipeg Media Golden Hand Award and the 1995 Canadian Federation of Humane Societies Media Commendation Award.

In a past life Bruce worked at YMCA-YWCA Camp Stephens. He has a blog where he and others write about camp and the people who worked and played there.

You can also find Bruce on Twitter where he posts and retweets all sorts of stuff.

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