Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

The (protest) Sounds of Silence

  • Print

NDP political operatives have been telling anybody who will listen for nearly a week that the Tories and the hog farmers have made a secret pact on Lake Winnipeg.

The Dipper spin machine got cranked up last week when dozens of hog farmers didn't show up after registering to speak on Bill 46 (The Save Lake Winnipeg Act) in committee. One after another, their names were called out on the evening of June 13, but nobody rose to speak. They weren't there.

The Conservatives had surprised the NDP by voting for the bill on second reading, and now about six dozen hog farmers and Manitoba Pork officials had decided against speaking against legislation that handcuffs hog farmers as Bill 17 did in 2008. Why didn't the farmers come to protest? Why did the Tories back the bill in second reading? (The House would later unanimously pass Bill 46 during at third reading.) It must be because the Tories had assured the hog farmers they would rip up Bill 46 if they ever got to power, according to the NDP spin specialists. That kept the hog producers from venting their anger, journalists were told.

So I called the hog producers' lobby group, Manitoba Pork, last week to check out the rumour that the hog farmers and the Tories had cut some secret deal over Bill 46. Andrew Dickson, the organization's general manager, said no way. "It was a silent protest," he said in explaining the farmers' absence.

When the NDP brought in Bill 17 prohibiting hog barn expansion in the eastern half of Manitoba, more than 300 angry farmers and industry officials spoke against the legislation at committee, and the "government never changed a word" of it, Dickson said. He said the province had also let it be known that it was not prepared to make any amendments to Bill 46. So the hog producers decided their silence was the best protest. And they didn't let the Conservatives in on it, said Dickson.

Karl Kynoch, Manitoba Pork's chairman, appeared before the committee on its second and final night of hearings Tuesday -- but only after being asked to attend by Agriculture Minister Stan Struthers, Dickson said. Kynoch read from a letter of protest the pork council had sent to the government about the legislation.

Hugh McFadyen's Conservatives opposed Bill 17, but supported Bill 46. The NDP will make political hay out of that.

But the pork council says it's wrong for hog farmers and its organization to be caught in this political game. "We're apolitical," Dickson said. "We deal with the government of the day. We do not engage in party politics. It's an absolute rule."

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

About Larry Kusch and Bruce Owen

Larry Kusch has been a journalist for 30 years, the last 20 with the Winnipeg Free Press. His is one of the newspaper's two legislative bureau reporters.

Raised on a Saskatchewan farm, he received an honours journalism degree from Carleton University in 1975.

At the Free Press, Larry has also worked as a general assignment reporter, business reporter, copy editor and assistant city editor.

Bruce Owen joined the Winnipeg Free Press in 1990 after four years working in other media.

He's worked in a number of positions at the Freep, including pet columnist, assistant city editor and police reporter. Right now he takes up space at the Manitoba legislature.

Bruce is one of five reporters who won a National Newspaper Award for the paper’s coverage of the 1997 Flood of the Century. He's also the recipient of the 1996 Volunteer Centre of Winnipeg Media Golden Hand Award and the 1995 Canadian Federation of Humane Societies Media Commendation Award.

In a past life Bruce worked at YMCA-YWCA Camp Stephens. He has a blog where he and others write about camp and the people who worked and played there.

You can also find Bruce on Twitter where he posts and retweets all sorts of stuff.

Ads by Google