Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

LRT vs BRT

  • Print

I am loathe to weigh in to the LRT/BRT debate, partly because I did dozens of depressing stories about it the first time Sam kiboshed the existing rapid transit plan and tried to give million of dollars back to the feds. Also, I have genuinely given up hope, as a citizen, that I will ride a rapid transit system in Winnipeg in my lifetime. As

State of the City

detailed, with elegance, the only word for this endless debacle begins with "cluster" and ends with a swear.

But, there is one nagging point I want to raise in the BRT vs. LRT debate. Five years ago, I rode Calgary's C-Train with a young policy wonk and transit expert from the U of C. He made one strong point: LRT works best where there is already some degree of density, where you can get off the train and walk to your condo instead of waiting for another bus to take you into the depths of Canyon Meadows or what-have-you. In Calgary's burbs, just like ours, the walk from a house to the LRT station can be one of those brutal urban experiences (ahem, Portage and Main) where you can see the station, you just can't get there. A berm, a freeway or a sound wall are in your way. Or at least they were five years ago.

So people take feeder buses to the station, and in Calgary's 'burbs that is still preferable to an hour's drive on the freeway. Feeder buses are a bit of a discouragement, but ridership on Calgary's suburban LRT lines is still pretty impressive.

Would that be the case in Winnipeg, especially in the southside suburbs where the city stands to make the most ridership gains? I just don't think so. Not when the drive down Pembina still only takes 20 or 30 minutes and you can swing into Starbucks.

The beauty of BRT is that buses can deek out of the speedy express corridor and head straight into the heart of Fort Richmond or Linden Woods or Waverley West, reducing the need for a transfer to a feeder bus. Light rail can't do that, unless we build rail lines into every neighbourhood.

LRT is admittedly sexier, and its pure, big-city coolness might attract some riders who think buses are déclassé. But most riders want the simplest, fastest ride to work with the fewest number of minutes standing beside a pole in -40 C, clutching their transfer, waiting for a bus.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

About Mary Agnes Welch

Mary Agnes Welch joined the Free Press in 2002, first as a general assignment reporter and then covering city hall and the Manitoba legislature before moving to her current post as public policy reporter.

Before Winnipeg, she worked at the Windsor Star and the Odessa American, a small daily newspaper in West Texas. There, in addition to covering more than 20 counties, she took high school football scores from coaches all over West Texas by phone every Friday night.

Mary Agnes is a graduate of Columbia University’s journalism school, has won several Western Ontario Newspaper Awards and has been part of two teams of reporters nominated for a Michener Award. In 2011, she was nominated for a National Newspaper Award in the beat category. She is also the former national president of the Canadian Association of Journalists.

She once misspelled "Shih Tzu" in the paper and received 37 emails from angry dog-owners.

Twitter

Ads by Google