Gordon Sinclair Jr.

  • 'I don't want to die a drunk'

    Bob Gill called again Tuesday night. He has phoned periodically over the years, since that first time on March 12, 1999, almost a decade after his inability to stay sober finally got him fired by the Winnipeg Police Service.
  • A doggone happy reunification

    It was late last week when Richard Pesti called with the good news. He said Winnipeg Humane Society CEO Bill McDonald had contacted him at the Salvation Army, where the homeless man has a dorm bed.
  • Daughter makes her mom proud

    It was late Sunday night when the story arrived like a modern rendering of a biblical parable. The email was signed at the bottom by a woman who gave her full name, Joanne Lussier-Demers. Followed by another: "Proud mother."
  • Whatever happened to Joe Kapone?

    It has been just over a decade since Manitobans -- Free Press readers among them -- donated more than $40,000 toward "legal fees" so a young Winnipeg man accused of being a low-level drug smuggler could be set free from a hellish South American prison where prosecutors wanted to leave him for 25 years. It would have been a death sentence. The headline on my first column about Joe Stone Lamontagne in May of 2003 -- three months after was arrested at an airport in Ecuador carrying half a kilo of cocaine in a suitcase -- posed a question.
  • Four women, one ring, and fate

    Mathematicians will tell you there is no such thing as fateful coincidences. That it's simply laws of chance at work.
  • Family makes appeal for permanent grave markers

    We all know Christmas tends to be a trying time for a lot of families, but it's uniquely so for the people Tina Fontaine called mother and father. As you might imagine.
  • Dogged pursuit of digs for Doogie

    The homeless man wasn't home when the Winnipeg Humane Society's CEO left a message at the Salvation Army on Main Street, where Richard Pesti sleeps. Bill McDonald wanted Pesti to call him.
  • Mystery boy at Jets game gets reward

    He was the mystery boy. The older kid who, after a Winnipeg Jets win last month, had a Jets team-autographed stick land in his hands.
  • Lost ring returned after nearly 30 years

    BITES FOR BREAKFAST... Ever lost anything with sentimental value -- searched everywhere you could think of -- then given up hope of ever finding it? Not an uncommon story. But this is. Rob Stanger was fresh out of university 28 years ago when he lost something precious and gave up hope of ever finding it. What he lost was the birthstone ring his parents gave him -- inscribed with his name and the name of his school, Brandon University -- when he graduated in 1986.
  • Defining the meaning of humane

    I know what kind of feedback I got over Saturday's column. A lot of emails dripping tears.
  • An inhumane decision?

    The "thank you" email -- meant for Winnipeggers and others who had helped him along the way -- was sent to our Random Acts of Kindness column by a man to whom life has been less than kind. And who, for the most part, had little for which to be thankful.
  • Boy's honesty warms Winnipeggers' hearts

    IN SEARCH OF A LITTLE GENTLEMAN... Last week, for a change of pace, I shared a Winnipeg feel-good story about how excited eight-year-old Connor McDaniel was to be handed a Jets stick autographed by Mark Scheifele, the first star of a recent win over the New Jersey Devils. It wasn't Scheifele who handed it to Connor. He tried. But after the Jets forward singled Connor out and dropped the stick over the glass, it landed in the seats where it was picked up by a boy who looked to be about 12. Of course, the older boy could have run off with the prize. Instead, he handed it to the little guy.
  • All eyes on our Métis mayor

    It's Monday afternoon, and Brian Bowman is in his city hall office explaining to a visitor he still hasn't framed the gift of a Goldeyes jersey Sam Katz left for him in a closet; or the Jets sweater Mark Chipman delivered to hang on his wall. Although the Bombers sweater, he points out, came framed, courtesy of Wade Miller. But decorating his office with Winnipeg sports memorabilia is not what I have come to discuss with our hip, handsome and immensely likable young mayor.
  • All Rinelle wanted was to keep her face hidden

    The media horde, national and local alike, came galloping to a news conference Thursday afternoon; one unlike any I've attended, and hopefully never will again. Not that it didn't sound like a great story at the time.
  • Fans confirm city is special

    It's easy to forget how blessed we are to live in Winnipeg. Say what?
  • Osborne station leaves bus riders shivering in the cold

    It started the way it so often does. With one person.
  • A place to call home

    Home, sweet home couldn't be sweeter. Two weeks ago today, a man walking his dogs in a suburban forest stopped to talk to a homeless young man who he learned was preparing to live out the winter sleeping in a tent among the trees.
  • Rinelle Harper's courage offers hope to aboriginal women

    The room at Children's Hospital was full of family -- her mother, father and grandparents -- but it was 16-year-old Rinelle Harper I noticed first. For an instant, I was jolted.
  • Mayor should push for cameras

    As much as Winnipeg police like to talk about the importance of community involvement, there is a often a sense -- both inside and outside the service -- that cops are separate and apart from the rest of us. From their perspective -- or at least some of them -- it's that we don't understand them. Or maybe we don't appreciate them enough.
  • Close to home

    He wasn't exactly a babe in the woods, but he wasn't much more than a kid. And that's where he was living -- in a tent in an urban forest.
  • Young man camped in the forest finds a home -- for now

    If a young man lived in the forest, would anyone care? I know someone who does.
  • Perhaps we can be forever young if we make ourselves so

    Old man look at my life, I'm a lot like you were
  • Oswald's stabbing words

    Halloween week might seem like a fitting time for a toga party. Although it can get out of control when Premier Greg Selinger is cast in the role of Julius Caesar and the target of an inner-circle revolt led by a group of front-bench cabinet ministers.
  • Break-ins while you're home particularly scary

    There's something about being the victim of residential break-ins that hits us where we live. Emotionally.
  • Tina's mother weeps

    Tina Fontaine has become a never-ending story, even in the age of the 24-hour news cycle. That's because the slaying of the 15-year-old aboriginal runaway last summer has become the rallying symbol of another never-ending story; the national shame of our murdered and missing aboriginal women and girls.

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