Brad Oswald

  • 'I could have texted all night': Selfie a modern My Fair Lady

    HOLLYWOOD -- For fans of Britain's most storied sci-fi export, she's immediately recognizable as Amy Pond. But these days, Scottish-born actress Karen Gillan is more like Amy Across-the-Pond, having transplanted herself and her career from the U.K. to the U.S. to take a starring role in the new ABC sitcom Selfie.
  • Peacock network regains top spot

    HOLLYWOOD — So, a funny thing happened to NBC on its way to the U.S. networks’ semi-annual press tour in Los Angeles. It stopped being the network everyone laughs at.
  • Ta-ta, traditional TV

    HOLLYWOOD -- If your TV viewing is limited to the old-fashioned television set in your living room or rec room and the familiar, traditional TV networks, there is a fast-growing roster of great shows and great performances by great actors that you're probably never going to see. The definition of "television" has changed greatly in the past few years, and will continue to evolve and expand with every new distribution platform and content-delivery option that arrives on the home-entertainment landscape.
  • Lisa Kudrow returns in comedy that HBO killed after one season, nine years ago

    HOLLYWOOD -- The Comeback is coming back. What makes this interesting, and not just slightly ironic, is that The Comeback was a made-for-cable comedy -- the post-Friends return to TV for Lisa Kudrow -- about a faded sitcom actress trying to use reality TV to re-energize her fading celebrity. Despite being a pretty funny show, it was cancelled by HBO after just one season. The Comeback wasn't much of a comeback vehicle for Kudrow.
  • Docu-reality series follows musicians' gridiron gig

    HOLLYWOOD -- They want to rock 'n' roll all night. That much, you already knew. But these days, the next part of the song lyric could just as well be "and score touchdowns every day."
  • Rock 'n' roll road trip

    HOLLYWOOD -- You probably already knew this: enthusiasm is infectious. The truth of this notion has seldom been more evident on the TV press tour than when Dave Grohl -- the rock 'n' roll genius whose two-decades-plus career started with the grunge invasion of Nirvana and continues with the hard-charging barrage of Foo Fighters -- made an appearance here during HBO's portion of the U.S. networks' semi-annual press tour in Los Angeles to discuss the upcoming music-documentary series Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways.
  • Naked and... certifiable?

    HOLLYWOOD -- The first question posed during an interview session for the Discovery Channel series Naked and Afraid was the best: "Why?"
  • Emmys snub Sarah and Cosima and Alison and...

    HOLLYWOOD -- It was a great morning for cable, but not so good for clones. Made-for-cable series such as Game of Thrones, Fargo, American Horror Story and Breaking Bad dominate the nominations for this year's Emmy Awards, which were unveiled Thursday at an early-morning announcement at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in Los Angeles. But the TV academy doubled down on last year's snub of the Canadian-made sci-fi series Orphan Black by once again leaving Saskatchewan native Tatiana Maslany out of the field of nominees for best actress in a drama series.
  • Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad garner nominations; Orphan Black left in the cold

    HOLLYWOOD — It was a great morning for cable, but not so good for clones. Made-for-cable series such as Game of Thrones, Fargo, American Horror Story and Breaking Bad dominate the nominations for this year’s Emmy Awards, which were unveiled Thursday at an early-morning announcement at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in Los Angeles. But the TV academy doubled down on last year’s snub of the Canadian-made sci-fi series Orphan Black by once again leaving Saskatchewan native Tatiana Maslany out of the field of nominees for best actress in a drama series.
  • TV ratings getting smarter

    HOLLYWOOD -- Times change. But they also stay the same. That, essentially, was the message being offered this week by executives from Nielsen, the research organization responsible for compiling and distributing audience-measurement statistics that make up the TV ratings and determine the rates networks charge for ads during their programs.
  • 'Was TV colour back then, mister?'

    Oh, my, how things have changed. In preparing for the latest edition of the U.S. networks' press tour in Los Angeles -- the semi-annual gathering of TV critics from around North America and the producers, network executives, actors and writers who make the television programs that fill the prime-time schedule -- it occurred to me the other day that this summer's jaunt to southern California marks the 25th anniversary of the first time I made the trip.
  • Amazingly dedicated

    There's no guarantee, of course, that they'll win it, but there was never a moment's doubt that they'd be in it. For Winnipeggers Nicole and Cormac Foster, being chosen as one of the 11 teams in The Amazing Race Canada was simply a matter of time.
  • Mysterious pregnancy sets new sci-fi series on far-out course

    What happens on the road stays on the road. And what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.
  • Challenging series doesn't have easy answers

    There's an endless list of movies and TV dramas that have examined the question "What does it all mean?" The new HBO drama The Leftovers takes this existential musing a step further by wondering "What if it doesn't mean anything?"
  • Diagnosis: compelling

    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. This familiar bit of folk wisdom isn't something that trauma teams in big-city hospital emergency rooms get to apply very often. But because documentary producer Terence Wrong continues to follow it as he chronicles the efforts of some of those ER doctors and nurses, the ABC series NY Med remains the most compelling and worthwhile of the summer TV season's "reality TV" arrivals.
  • Doc plays up McQueen's cool, ignores the toxic

    There's cool, and then there's cool. And then there's Steve McQueen.
  • Visit home not fun when father is old Middle East despot

    Whether there's truth to the old saying "You can't go home again" is open to debate. But the new FX drama Tyrant demonstrates, in no uncertain terms, why sometimes you shouldn't.
  • Band biopic not all music to our ears

    The music is infectious. The harmonies are uplifting. The voice is divine. The story... well, that's another story.
  • A bloody good send-off

    It's true. There's blood. Buckets of it.
  • Excitement comes in waves on action-filled series' pilot

    There's nothing unusual, in movies and TV series with a military theme, about a storyline involving a top-secret mission. What makes the new made-for-cable drama The Last Ship a bit different, however, is that the men and women carrying out the mission are not in on the secret.
  • Easy to get tied up in courtroom thriller's twists

    Sometimes, good lawyers keep bad people from getting what they really deserve. In real life, as in movies and on TV, a lot of non-legal people have a problem with this.
  • Boffo Bochco

    TV doesn't always have to be about doing something new. In fact, sometimes, the old and familiar can be extremely satisfying if it's done very well. Such is the case with Murder in the First, a new cop drama that premièred last week and airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on Bravo. Produced for U.S. cable's TNT network, the series takes one of TV's most reliable tropes and seeks neither to redefine nor reinvent it.
  • '30 Rock' star ready to rumble in persona of all-conquering superior specimen

    There's a simple reason why Judah Friedlander became the World Champion. Because, well, somebody had to.
  • It's showtime for U.S. television networks

    After a soul-crushingly cold winter and a reluctant-to-arrive spring, and with lingering sub-normal temperatures suggesting summer might never actually arrive, it seems both premature and unkind to be talking about autumn. But for the TV business, spring's arrival means that fall is here, too, because it's time for the U.S. networks to unveil the rosters of shows that will fill their schedules when September brings the launch of a new television season.
  • Dark delights

    It's dreadful, in the most delightful way imaginable. And for subscribers to premium cable's Movie Central, it really is worth every penny. The new period drama Penny Dreadful is a murky, menacing, mightily frightening mash-up of literary characters, storylines and styles that unapologetically straddles the line between historical fact and outrageously fanciful fiction.

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