Gary Lawless

  • Frolik controls his future with one-year deal

    The Winnipeg Jets and Michael Frolik agreed to one more season, but really the clock has now begun to tick on whether the player stays in Winnipeg long term or is traded at the deadline next March. Frolik and the Jets had a salary arbitration hearing set for Thursday but avoided that potentially messy process, agreeing Tuesday morning to a one-year contract worth $3.3 million.
  • Bombers without borders

    Maybe Mike O'Shea has read and heard some of it. Maybe he hasn't. But it doesn't matter whether one newspaper thinks his team is heading to the Grey Cup or one radio station thinks they're a mirage. Not to him. "My focus has been first to get the guys to experience winning and secondly to get them to want to win for one another," said the Blue Bombers head coach, during a conversation early Monday morning. "Winning will help convince, not only the fans who are obviously very important, not just to Winnipeg but to the league, but it will help convince players too. That's the biggest concern. Getting buy in from the players and having them really believe in what we're doing. Success, individual success but more importantly winning as a team, is paramount."
  • Walters needs to keep his eyes on the prize

    Kyle Walters can't be handcuffed by the past or the current appetite for victory here in Winnipeg. Walters needs to be free to chase more than a .500 record and some good feelings this summer. All things being equal, the Blue Bombers should get spanked tonight in B.C. by the Lions, but for Walters a second loss on the season should only affirm the fact his roster is thin, light on Canadian talent and still in the very early stages of a rebuild.
  • Dungy would deny Sam the opportunity he was given

    Do unto others. Well, just some others, says self-proclaimed Christian and former NFL coach turned TV analyst Tony Dungy.
  • O-line a disaster area

    The offensive line is the foundation every football team is built on and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers hogs simply aren't good enough. The Canadians are poor and the Americans average, rather than the standouts they should be. All the good work GM Kyle Walters has managed to date is going to be undone by his offensive line.
  • O-line a disaster area

    The offensive line is the foundation every football team is built on and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers’ hogs simply aren’t good enough. The Canadians are poor and the Americans average, rather than the standouts they should be. All the good work GM Kyle Walters has managed to date is going to be undone by his offensive line.
  • Bombers GM has had to sow plenty of seeds and right now they're reaping wins

    Lots of teams win early and fade late to join the heap forever known as non-playoff qualifiers. So, of course, common sense suggests Winnipeg Blue Bombers fans should temper their enthusiasm. But that's unlikely if Kyle Walters has anything to say about it.
  • Guessing games: Some thoughts and reckonings following the NHL draft

    It's both a pursuit of promise and a million-dollar guess. Late Saturday night the pressure and toll of a season on the road could be seen on the sweaty faces of NHL scouts pounding Bud Lights in any number of Philadelphia bars.
  • A little snarl goes a long way

    Philadelphia -- Florida Panthers GM Dale Tallon gave Jayce Hawryluk a guarantee and lived up to it. Tallon doesn't know it, but Hawryluk lives by a guarantee of his own. Nothing will stop him from playing in the NHL. Nothing. No one would make the mistake of calling Hawryluk an artful skater. And he's got a temper and so far he's been labelled immature and more than a little on the edge.
  • Maurice guarding Pavelec's back

    PHILADELPHIA -- Somewhere around a bonfire at a Manitoba cottage the Winnipeg Jets' goaltending woes were discussed Friday night. And in a bar, and over dinner, and between a father and a son on a swing set. It's the hockey subject of the summer and it's everywhere. It also came up underneath the stands of a hockey rink Friday and one of the men in the discussion was Paul Maurice, who not only has an opinion but some actual say in the matter.
  • GM won't make a trade for sake of making a trade

    PHILADELPHIA -- The pressure of a lot of balls in the air, losing seasons and the busiest time of the year for hockey executives has resulted in some GMs making mistakes with long-lasting implications. This is what Kevin Cheveldayoff must guard against in the coming hours and days. Certainly, the Jets GM would like to make a trade to improve his team but his deal requirements make up a long list. His price for any of his young and locked-up players is high. It must remain so.
  • Fast-rising Sanheim caps stellar season

    PHILADELPHIA -- This time a year ago, Travis Sanheim was going to bed safe in the comfort of his status as a member of the mighty AAA Midget Yellowhead Chiefs. On Saturday morning -- Sunday at the latest -- he'll wake up with a new jersey draped over his hotel room furniture. New York Rangers or Winnipeg Jets or Montreal Canadiens or Florida Panthers or any one of 30 teams. Goodbye Elkhorn, hello NHL. Knocking the smile off Sanheim's square-jawed and very lightly whiskered (a nicer way of saying peach-fuzzed) face is understandably impossible these days. "I was just hoping to make Calgary's roster this year. I never imagined this could all happen," said the 18-year-old Sanheim, born and raised in Elkhorn and chosen by the Calgary Hitmen in the ninth round (177th overall) of the 2011 WHL Bantam Draft.
  • No joke -- Jets have decision at centre ice

    On the surface, the question is "Will the Winnipeg Jets be better with or without Olli Jokinen?" but the deeper consideration is "Can they afford to have him taking up space in the lineup?" If re-signed, Jokinen would come back as the Jets' third-line centre and there is evidence to suggest that's not a bad fit if the price is reasonable. However, the true issue for an organization in the development stage hinges more on what a commitment to Jokinen does to the growth of centre prospect Adam Lowry.
  • O'Shea's gotta keep a lid on his temper

    Mike O'Shea is going to have to figure out how to be a little less like Mike O'Shea. After a playing career of small-picture focus, where winning each battle, play and game dominated his very existence, O'Shea is now going to need to look at the big picture and take a loss now and again to make future gains. If O'Shea allows his unbridled passion for winning to bubble over early in this season, he may very well impede the growth of his Winnipeg Blue Bombers.
  • Grey Cup is in our blood, our mud, our beer

    From Mosca to Flutie to Ploen to Lancaster to Walby and Buono, the Canadian Football League is what it is because it's nationwide with a soul that is distinctly Canuck. On the Prairies, across the Rockies, in La Belle Province and down among the big shoulders of Ontario's cities, this game is played in our backlots, high schools, campuses and biggest stadiums.
  • GMs girding loins for lunacy

    July 1 used to be the most dangerous day on the calendar for NHL GMs, but now they have five more days to blow their brains out on a sexy but treacherous free-agent signing. In the summer of 2011, the scene at the Toronto office of Brad Richards' agent was something like this: NHL executives milling outside like cheesy suburban kids trying to get into a Manhattan night club. Inside, Richards and his legion of lawyers reviewing offers with their feet resting on glass-topped tables, chomping pistachios and sipping chilled drinks.
  • No gain, no Kane

    Will the Winnipeg Jets trade Evander Kane this summer? It may be the most asked question around the Jets, but the best answer is no one, including GM Kevin Cheveldayoff, can predict what offers may show up in Philadelphia at the draft next week.
  • Changing of the guard in Montreal

    TORONTO -- Labour negotiations are finished, the Ottawa Redblacks have played a pre-season game and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers are done until they begin the games that count for points. The CFL will kickoff a season with nine teams this summer and this is our first instalment of Nine Across the Nation.
  • CFLPA in need of complete overhaul

    It's going to take a structural overhaul and fresh leadership to straighten out the inept mess that's become our pro football league's players union. In many aspects the recent labour dispute between the CFL and its players union was a waste of time and energy. However, it did shine a light on how ill prepared the CFLPA is to represent its constituents.
  • On the Blue bubble

    One thing is certain in Bomberland these days and that is that very few incumbents should feel comfortable about their job security. Returning players such as running back Will Ford and punter Mike Renaud are clinging to their jobs, and the message around training camp is very clear: produce or pack.
  • Fit for a King

    Mike Richards is exactly what the Winnipeg Jets need. If he hits the market, the Jets will have as strong an opportunity to sign him as any team in the NHL. It’ll be a deal they’ll have to get done.
  • Foul stench of decay lifted from Big Blue

    It doesn't smell like crap in Bomberland anymore. If confidence comes in the form of an aura it can also be said there's a stench that comes along with being inept. That smell permeated the Blue Bombers and everything they did the last couple of years. It's gone.
  • Take the money and run, CFL owners

    The CBA being foisted on the players' association will do little to dissuade the notion the CFL is a minor league. Minor-league minimum salary and minor-league working conditions are the hallmarks of this deal.
  • Boosting CFL salary cap doesn't do much for the little guy

    The face of the simmering CFL labour war is the guy earning $45,000. But that’s not at all what it’s about The players association is right when they say its players don’t make enough money, but it’s not true across the board and that’s why this fight should be more about league minimums than an increased salary cap.
  • Boosting CFL salary cap doesn’t do much for little guy

    THE face of the simmering CFL labour war is the guy earning $45,000. But that’s not at all what it’s about. The players association is right when they say its players don’t make enough money, but it’s not true across the board and that’s why this fight should be more about league minimums than an increased salary cap.

About Gary Lawless

Gary Lawless is the Free Press sports columnist and co-host of the Hustler and Lawless show on TSN 1290 Winnipeg and www.winnipegfreepress.com
Lawless began covering sports as a rookie reporter at The Chronicle-Journal in Thunder Bay after graduating from journalism school at Durham College in Ontario.
After a Grey Cup winning stint with the Toronto Argonauts in the communications department, Lawless returned to Thunder Bay as sports editor.
In 1999 he joined the Free Press and after working on the night sports desk moved back into the field where he covered pro hockey, baseball and football beats prior to being named columnist.

Poll

What should the city do with the 102-year-old Arlington Street bridge?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google