Jerrad Peters

  • And the winner is... Winnipeg

    Winnipeg was the big winner at Saturday's 2015 Women's World Cup group stage draw in Gatineau, Que. With Canada previously scheduled for matches in Edmonton and Montreal, a section including one or two high-profile teams and their well-known players was always going to be the next-best thing for the other host cities. And it's exactly what Winnipeg got.
  • This time, Revolution could succeed

    They are the nearly-men of Major League Soccer, and they have come as near as near can possibly be. On four occasions, in 2002 and then in 2005, 2006 and 2007 consecutively, New England Revolution contested the annual final to determine the winner of MLS Cup.
  • Ballon d'Or voting a bloated farce

    One of the few things FIFA fully discloses is the voting breakdown for the Ballon d'Or. It makes for interesting, if not frustrating, reading. The highest honour available to male footballers, the trophy has been lifted by the likes of Alfredo Di Stefano, Johan Cruyff, Zinedine Zidane and, more recently, Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo.
  • Pressure on City in weekend derby

    For once, the Manchester Derby is less about United and more about City -- although not for the reasons that were supposed to define this rivalry in the current campaign, never mind the ones to follow. If the 2013 retirement of longtime United manager Sir Alex Ferguson was supposed to signal a rebuilding period at English football's record champions -- which it did -- the ascendance of City was supposed to coincide with their neighbours' decline -- something that also seemed to be happening when they lifted the trophy last spring.
  • Suarez champing at the bit to hit pitch today

    Luis Suarez just wants to play football. Since exiting the World Cup in disgrace after biting Italy's Giorgio Chiellini, the Uruguay striker has done little more than train, contest the odd friendly match and answer questions about his alarming penchant for gnawing on the necks and shoulders of his opponents.
  • Raise a glass to yourselves, sports fans

    Is your favourite sports team a "we?" When you think about the games they'll play, do you ponder things like, "We've got to beat Chelsea this weekend"; or, "We could win the World Series"; or, "We really need a win against Calgary tomorrow?"
  • Derbies lifelong battles for fans

    Rivalries are at the heart of sport. Whether regional, local or based on rather more severe factors, such as socioeconomics and religion, the fissures that divide one side from another have a way of evoking the sort of passions that turn a game into so much more.
  • Benzema does more than score

    Karim Benzema doesn't shy away from criticism -- which, in itself is impressive given the volume of it that follows him on a day-to-day basis and the detractors who generate it. But he also meets the disparagement head on, both in his tempered, public comments and the quality of his play on the pitch.
  • Bad times for the Three Lions

    England's Wednesday win over Norway began in a less than half-filled Wembley Stadium, was watched by a smaller television audience than that which tuned in for the Great British Bake Off (actually) and concluded with an expletive-filled rant from manager Roy Hodgson. In between, the Three Lions managed just a pair of shots on target (the poor journalist who pointed out that fact was the subject of Hodgson's tirade), and while Wayne Rooney scored the game's only goal from the penalty spot in the 68th minute, his teammates seemed to play better upon his substitution in the 70th minute.
  • Xabi's decision smart, classy move

    Xabi Alonso is sharp as a tack. Following Spain's hasty exit from the 2014 World Cup -- and his own, prominent role in the three-match travesty -- the midfielder on Wednesday announced his retirement from international football, helping open the door to the country's next, up-and-coming generation.
  • Blues can't lose

    Jose Mourinho is out of excuses. Last season the Chelsea manager deployed some curious delay tactics when addressing his side's ability to contend for the Premier League title, offering the Blues were a "little horse that needs milk and needs to learn how to jump."
  • American icon will be missed

    Four months ago, I asked Landon Donovan about his retirement plans. Having recently turned 32, the Los Angeles Galaxy forward was about to set the all-time goal-scoring mark in Major League Soccer and was eagerly anticipating the upcoming World Cup.
  • Messi idolized, but Maradona has own church

    Lionel Messi was 11 years old when the Hand of God chapel went up in his hometown of Rosario. Consecrated as Iglesia Maradoniana, the "Church of Maradona," it became a shrine to Argentina's favourite hero -- a gathering place where El Diego's works and wonders could be venerated, his outfoxing of the English and harassment by FIFA recalled and revered.
  • Germans starting to own this autobahn

    "Off his sick bed and into the headlines," was how broadcaster Peter Drury decribed the miracle of Mats Hummels.
    Just four days after being left behind as his Germany teammates traveled to Porto Alegre for a round of 16 match against Algeria, the central defender was out from under the covers and heading home the winner against France in Friday's World Cup quarter-final.
  • Will Neymar's magic continue vs. Colombia?

    The World Cup of upsets, hockey scores and wild entertainment has become the World Cup of defensive suffocation, anxiety and extra time. Apparently the eight teams remaining in the tournament learned their lesson during an unpredictable group stage that saw many of the supposed superpowers -- Spain, Italy, England and Portugal among them -- dropped at the first hurdle.
  • Costa Rica the Cinderella story

    Cinderella has wavy, silver hair, a fiery temper and, a few hours after a shave, the hint of a moustache. No, we're not talking about the fictional girl, typically illustrated as virtuous and blonde, but rather the archetypal Cinderella -- the subject of neglect, obscurity and mistreatment.
  • All quiet on the England front

    Listen carefully. If you don't make a sound you just might hear it. Or not. That's the thing with silence. It's an absence, not a noise. The way white is not a colour. With their World Cup opener scheduled for today, the England football team is an absence of colour and sound.
  • World Cup is a spectacle — not a tournament

    By the time the World Cup final kicks off on July 13 at the iconic Maracan£, few people will actually have a direct, rooting interest in the outcome. Only two countries will be preparing a celebration and the pride of victory will be experienced by only one of them. But everyone will party.
  • Return to Liverpool poetic justice

    Rickie Lambert's soccer story started at Liverpool in 1992 when the forward joined the Reds as a 10-year-old. He remained on the club's books for five years until, as he recalled last summer, he was told he "wasn't good enough."
  • A Real chance for No. 10 in Madrid

    La Decima and horse placenta: they are the buzzwords of today's Champions League final in which Real Madrid, the initial romancers of the European Cup, will look to win a 10th continental title at the expense of Atletico Madrid, who have gone to extremes to expedite the recovery of their most important player. "La Decima is not an obsession," remarked Real Madrid manager Carlo Ancelotti in his Tuesday press conference. "It is a great motivation. We have such a big opportunity to go down in the history of this club."
  • Blend of castoffs, rejects a huge success

    When they line up against Barcelona for today’s La Liga’s title decider at Camp Nou, Atletico Madrid will consist of a handful of underappreciated homegrown players surrounded by an assortment of castoffs, rejects and other clubs’ hand-me-downs. They may be only a single point from winning the Spanish top flight for the first time in 18 years, and they’re also headed to next weekend’s Champions League final against local rivals Real Madrid, but this Atletico side is the unlikeliest of unlikely contenders — a squad built with players nobody wanted.
  • Man City can't afford misstep

    By Sunday evening, Manchester City and Atletico Madrid could be champions of England and Spain, respectively. "Could" being the operative word.
  • This tournament's nothing but a winner

    On Thursday, the confederations that govern soccer in the Americas -- CONCACAF in the North, CONMEBOL in the South -- announced an agreement to hold a joint tournament just over two years from now. In June 2016, the Copa America Centenario will be staged in about a dozen cities throughout the United States, bringing together 16 teams from two continents and creating the sort of exposure the sport won't have experienced this side of Europe since the 1994 World Cup.
  • Sir Alex will be replaced many times

    At some point, the succession procedure following Sir Alex Ferguson's retirement from more than a quarter-century of management at Manchester United was always going to end up here. And, no, "here" is not the interim appointment of long-time player Ryan Giggs and a backroom staff of United old-boys, including Phil Neville, Nicky Butt and Paul Scholes.
  • Scousers will be out in droves

    It has been a mostly discouraging nine years on Merseyside. Yes, Liverpool Football Club's winning of the 2006 FA Cup can perhaps reduce by a year the period of tribulation, but domestic cup runs and mid-table finishes are not what the biggest institutions in football are supposed to be about.

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