Jerrad Peters

  • Messi idolized, but Maradona has own church

    Lionel Messi was 11 years old when the Hand of God chapel went up in his hometown of Rosario. Consecrated as Iglesia Maradoniana, the "Church of Maradona," it became a shrine to Argentina's favourite hero -- a gathering place where El Diego's works and wonders could be venerated, his outfoxing of the English and harassment by FIFA recalled and revered.
  • Germans starting to own this autobahn

    "Off his sick bed and into the headlines," was how broadcaster Peter Drury decribed the miracle of Mats Hummels.
    Just four days after being left behind as his Germany teammates traveled to Porto Alegre for a round of 16 match against Algeria, the central defender was out from under the covers and heading home the winner against France in Friday's World Cup quarter-final.
  • Will Neymar's magic continue vs. Colombia?

    The World Cup of upsets, hockey scores and wild entertainment has become the World Cup of defensive suffocation, anxiety and extra time. Apparently the eight teams remaining in the tournament learned their lesson during an unpredictable group stage that saw many of the supposed superpowers -- Spain, Italy, England and Portugal among them -- dropped at the first hurdle.
  • Costa Rica the Cinderella story

    Cinderella has wavy, silver hair, a fiery temper and, a few hours after a shave, the hint of a moustache. No, we're not talking about the fictional girl, typically illustrated as virtuous and blonde, but rather the archetypal Cinderella -- the subject of neglect, obscurity and mistreatment.
  • All quiet on the England front

    Listen carefully. If you don't make a sound you just might hear it. Or not. That's the thing with silence. It's an absence, not a noise. The way white is not a colour. With their World Cup opener scheduled for today, the England football team is an absence of colour and sound.
  • World Cup is a spectacle — not a tournament

    By the time the World Cup final kicks off on July 13 at the iconic Maracan£, few people will actually have a direct, rooting interest in the outcome. Only two countries will be preparing a celebration and the pride of victory will be experienced by only one of them. But everyone will party.
  • Return to Liverpool poetic justice

    Rickie Lambert's soccer story started at Liverpool in 1992 when the forward joined the Reds as a 10-year-old. He remained on the club's books for five years until, as he recalled last summer, he was told he "wasn't good enough."
  • A Real chance for No. 10 in Madrid

    La Decima and horse placenta: they are the buzzwords of today's Champions League final in which Real Madrid, the initial romancers of the European Cup, will look to win a 10th continental title at the expense of Atletico Madrid, who have gone to extremes to expedite the recovery of their most important player. "La Decima is not an obsession," remarked Real Madrid manager Carlo Ancelotti in his Tuesday press conference. "It is a great motivation. We have such a big opportunity to go down in the history of this club."
  • Blend of castoffs, rejects a huge success

    When they line up against Barcelona for today’s La Liga’s title decider at Camp Nou, Atletico Madrid will consist of a handful of underappreciated homegrown players surrounded by an assortment of castoffs, rejects and other clubs’ hand-me-downs. They may be only a single point from winning the Spanish top flight for the first time in 18 years, and they’re also headed to next weekend’s Champions League final against local rivals Real Madrid, but this Atletico side is the unlikeliest of unlikely contenders — a squad built with players nobody wanted.
  • Man City can't afford misstep

    By Sunday evening, Manchester City and Atletico Madrid could be champions of England and Spain, respectively. "Could" being the operative word.
  • This tournament's nothing but a winner

    On Thursday, the confederations that govern soccer in the Americas -- CONCACAF in the North, CONMEBOL in the South -- announced an agreement to hold a joint tournament just over two years from now. In June 2016, the Copa America Centenario will be staged in about a dozen cities throughout the United States, bringing together 16 teams from two continents and creating the sort of exposure the sport won't have experienced this side of Europe since the 1994 World Cup.
  • Sir Alex will be replaced many times

    At some point, the succession procedure following Sir Alex Ferguson's retirement from more than a quarter-century of management at Manchester United was always going to end up here. And, no, "here" is not the interim appointment of long-time player Ryan Giggs and a backroom staff of United old-boys, including Phil Neville, Nicky Butt and Paul Scholes.
  • Scousers will be out in droves

    It has been a mostly discouraging nine years on Merseyside. Yes, Liverpool Football Club's winning of the 2006 FA Cup can perhaps reduce by a year the period of tribulation, but domestic cup runs and mid-table finishes are not what the biggest institutions in football are supposed to be about.
  • Fast times at humble Everton

    Don't look now, but Everton is poised to make a late run for a Champions League position. The same Everton that lost longtime manager David Moyes to Manchester United last spring; the same Everton that went three matches before posting their first win of the season back in August.
  • Tremble in fear of mighty Bayern

    How can club football's most dominant team become even better? It's a question Pep Guardiola no doubt obsessed himself with after succeeding Jupp Heynckes as Bayern Munich manager last summer.
  • Sad shame Rivaldo best known for fakery

    There are two images that stand out from Rivaldo's near quarter century as a professional footballer. The first is the attacker upside-down in mid air -- executing a spectacular bicycle kick that completed his hat-trick in Barcelona's 3-2 win over Valencia on the final day of the 2000-01 season.
  • Man U's superhero cape has a big tear

    It isn't merely the sixth-place position in the Premier League standings that has ramped up hysteria in and around Old Trafford. Nor is it the domestic cup defeats or a 2-0 loss to Olympiacos that threatens to cut short their Champions League campaign. Naturally, an accumulation of failures both on the pitch and in the transfer market was always going to be cause for concern at a club like Manchester United, but with each successive shortcoming what is being increasingly risked is something far bigger, and considerably more definitive, than seven month's worth of poor results.
  • Bratwurst with a side of sauerkraut

    As far as extended metaphors are concerned, it was almost José Mourinho-esque. "The Champions League is like a good meal in a good restaurant," remarked Bayern Munich manager Pep Guardiola this week. "The Bundesliga -- it's like eating pizza or hamburgers every day."
  • Mourinho's Chelsea revamp pays dividends

    Last Monday, the football world was given a sneak peak at Jose Mourinho's new operating system: Chelsea 2.0. The immediate response was overwhelmingly positive, with notable exceptions in Manchester and pockets of London.
  • For now, Diego's back where his heart is

    Diego RIBAS DA CUNHA never wanted to leave Spain in the first place. In the summer of 2011 -- just a year after completing a club-record 15.5-million-euro move from Juventus to Wolfsburg -- the enigmatic Brazilian known simply as Diego joined Atletico Madrid on a year's loan.
  • Time for Canada to up its game, consider hosting World Cup

    Is Canada ready for a truly national conversation about soccer? About something more close to home than the popular European leagues, more widespread than the population pockets supporting Major League Soccer franchises, more penetrating than the technical, albeit important, language presented in the Canadian Soccer Association's latest strategic plan?
  • Rossoneri get live wire in Seedorf

    When AC Milan director Adriano Galliani remarked that incoming manager Clarence Seedorf would "give a jolt" to the slumping Serie A side he wasn't exaggerating. Just four days removed from his retirement as a player and yet to oversee his first match in charge of the Rossoneri, Seedorf's return to the San Siro has nevertheless been all that anyone around the team -- players, administrators, reporters, fans -- has wanted to discuss.
  • Old Argentina foes face off in Spain

    In early 1988, long before becoming notorious for getting David Beckham sent off in a World Cup knockout match, Velez Sarsfield midfielder Diego Simeone managed to trick the referee into ejecting Newell's Old Boys opponent Gerardo Martino during an Argentine Primera Division encounter. This weekend, not quite 26 years since the confrontation, the two will once again go up against each other, and just like during their playing days the crafty, devious Simeone will be looking to pull one over the thoughtful, creative Martino.
  • Mata, Chelsea should part ways ASAP

    Juan MATA had every right to vent his frustration after being withdrawn shortly after the restart at Southampton on New Year's Day. A fringe player at Chelsea since the return of Jose Mourinho -- and this after twice being named the club's Player of the Season -- his removal in favour of Oscar was yet another reminder he remains mostly outside his manager's plans, that his place in the Spain setup just five months before the World Cup is in jeopardy due to a sudden and surprising lack of first-team football.
  • Now they can kick each other around pitch

    Rarely has the Derby della Madonnina been contested by teams so far removed from the top of Serie A. Rarer still has it been as important to either of them. "I do not look at the standings," remarked AC Milan goalkeeper Christian Abbiati in a pre-match press conference. "I saw them once and felt like crying."

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