Curtis Brown

  • FIFA good at marketing FIFA, not cities

    Any time you go anywhere new, the first thing you experience is the airport. And no matter where you travel in the world, the airport experience tends to be comfortably yet disturbingly familiar. The duty-free shops sell the same stuff you don't need. The gift shops sell the same magazines and overpriced snacks. And food and beverages served in these places are practically the same no matter where you go. This is why I had an eerie sense of déj vu during the FIFA Women's World Cup. A year ago, I stood in another gleaming new stadium in a remote part of a large country. In the concourse and outside the stadium, what I saw, ate, drank and felt in the Estadio Mané Garrincha in Brasilia, Brazil, was almost exactly what I saw, ate, drank and felt this week at Investors Group Field. Both stadiums were plastered in the logos of FIFA and its official partners, such as Budweiser and Coca-Cola. There were many more displays outside Brasilia's stadium, but both gave a corporate, antiseptic experience.
  • Will Notley 'bump' help federal NDP in Manitoba?

    A lot of very strange and unprecedented things have been happening in Canadian politics lately. The NDP's historic win in Alberta's recent provincial election definitely counts as unexpected -- but it was what happened afterward that really caught political observers off guard. A series of national opinion polls showed that immediately following the provincial NDP victory in Alberta, support for the federal NDP started to climb. Polls conducted by EKOS Research and Ipsos Reid in late May show the federal New Democrats are now in a three-way tie with the federal Conservatives and Liberals. With Canadians set to cast ballots in a federal election in just a few months, this really sets up an interesting dynamic as there is no clear second choice for voters hoping for a non-Conservative government.
  • Party elites select a premier? There's got to be a better way

    Next weekend, roughly 2,000 people — less than 0.2 per cent of Manitoba’s population — will cast ballots to choose the next premier of our province. When you frame it this way, the process of picking the next NDP leader and premier seems elitist and even undemocratic. How can such a small number of people decide who gets to occupy the province’s highest political office?
  • NDP on homestretch

    Next weekend, roughly 2,000 people -- less than 0.2 per cent of Manitoba's population -- will cast ballots to choose the next premier of our province. When you frame it this way, the process of picking the next NDP leader and premier seems elitist and even undemocratic. How can such a small number of people decide who gets to occupy the province's highest political office?
  • Ashton, Selinger battling it out

    When one politician endorses another politician, does it really make a difference? As the Manitoba NDP selects delegates for its upcoming convention and leadership vote, party members and the public have been hearing a lot about who endorsed which of the three candidates for party leader.
  • Doer dynasty, or aberration?

    ON the morning after the 2007 provincial election, the dawn of the "Doer Dynasty" was proclaimed in this newspaper. Easily re-elected as premier the previous evening, Gary Doer had won a stunning third majority victory, taking 36 seats in the provincial election and consigning the Progressive Conservative and Liberal parties to another four long, demoralizing years in opposition.

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