August 27, 2015


By Bartley Kives

Columnists

We've got winter: Let's show it off

We need to market our frozen assets better

When the overnight lows bottom out around -28 C, some Winnipeggers wonder why they choose to live here.

Personally, I think this is silly. Cold snaps, even bitter ones such as this, rarely last more than a week and are easy to enjoy if you do what grandma says and dress for the weather.

Brianna Koller trains for her first marathon Wednesday as the temperature dipped to -31 with the wind chill.

MELISSA TAIT / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Brianna Koller trains for her first marathon Wednesday as the temperature dipped to -31 with the wind chill. Photo Store

BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS 
Raw:Almond hosted its first pop-up restaurant on the Red River last January.

WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Raw:Almond hosted its first pop-up restaurant on the Red River last January. Photo Store

In fact, Winnipeg would be well-served to actually celebrate its status as one of the coldest cities on the planet. Truly cold weather is not a common quality in an easily accessible corner of the planet.

What many Winnipeggers detest -- the depths of our subarctic winter -- is actually a commodity we should sell to the world.

What many Winnipeggers detest -- the depths of our subarctic winter -- is actually a commodity we should sell to the world

In the middle of the summer, tourists from all over the planet visit California's Death Valley National Park just to experience some of the most unpleasant heat there is on Earth.

Remote areas of Libya, Chad and Niger are even hotter. But Death Valley is only a few hours away from Las Vegas and Los Angeles by car, not to mention a lot safer than the lawless regions of the Sahara.

Winnipeg, only two hours by plane from Chicago or Toronto, can and should attract the very same sort of curiosity-seeker. The problem is, the city is only beginning to fully embrace its intense winters on the same scale as other winter cities and towns around the world.

Harbin, a northern Chinese city of 5.8 million people, holds a massive ice-and-snow-sculpture festival that illuminates large tracts of the city at night for a month every January. The average January low in Harbin is -24 C, one degree colder than the average for Winnipeg.

Jukkasj§rvi, a village in northern Sweden, pioneered the ice-hotel concept, while the Norwegian ski-resort town of Geilo is home to a music festival where all the instruments are made of ice.

And yes, tourists actually show up in these places, where the locals embrace winter.

Once Winnipeg gets with the frigid program, we can expect tourists to do the same.

The city is starting to get it. The Forks started with a simple river skating-and-walking trail. Now, the Red River Mutual Trail boasts an internationally renowned design contest (yes, those non-warming warming huts), the Raw:Almond pop-up restaurant on the Red River (back for a second year) and a day of music programming at the warming huts.

There are also new features this year, such as an outdoor venue for the Riel Gentlemen's Choir, a Festival du Voyageur beer garden for a week in February and a winter fashion show, also planned by Le Festival.

"We started with skating and walking, which appealed to the outdoor-recreation crowd. Now we have all this," said Paul Jordan, chief operating officer at The Forks. "There's a bunch of layers, and each new layer grabs more people and creative types."

The Forks also plans to extend a river cycling trail all the way to the University of Manitoba campus during the Winter Cycling Congress planned for February. If that works out well, a skating trail will also extend all the way from The Forks to the U of M, allowing students to commute on blades to school.

"If there's a north wind, it's going to be great going there, but not so great coming back," Jordan joked.

The two new Festival du Voyageur efforts on the river do not really mark an expansion of the festival from its St. Boniface footprint, as festival staff have worked behind the scenes on the river trail for years.

The festival is often approached to conduct winter programming farther away from St. Boniface, but simply doesn't have the resources to expand in this way, said executive director Ginette Lavack Walters.

Instead, the festival is focused on doing more within its grounds. And that might even involve a winter campground that would build upon an overnight quinzhee-stay experiment from the last decade.

"I would love to do a campground," said Lavack Walters, conjuring up images of a frozen Folk Festival in St. Boniface. "I need ideas, input and a means of doing it."

The same crazy European tourists who brave Death Valley in July would brave Winnipeg in February -- if only someone invited them.

There will always be winter here. It's time we did a heck of a lot more with the damn thing.

bartley.kives@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition December 13, 2013 A4

History

Updated on Friday, December 13, 2013 at 8:23 AM CST: Replaces photo

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.

Scroll down to load more

Top