Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

No border tax

  • Print

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is proposing a new crossing fee at land borders to help pay for the increased cost of policing them, but the idea of taxing Canadians to pay for American security is weak.

The Americans have been boosting security at the border since the events of 9/11, but the idea of a new tax would be counterproductive for many reasons. U.S. businesses that depend on tourists, for example, are opposed to the idea because of fears it would reduce traffic, which is currently worth about $21 billion a year in Canadian spending alone.

Related Items

A fee for every car and every person on a tourist bus would also contribute to even longer delays at the border, which could have serious consequences for commercial carriers. It also is contrary to the spirit of free trade and to the idea of a "North American community," as the Canadian Chamber of Commerce put it.

Bridge tolls at key crossings are collected to pay for the infrastructure. Air travellers pay a small fee on their airline tickets to enter the U.S., but such fees have become customary and are not disruptive.

Security trumps all other concerns in the U.S., but it should not be allowed to weaken the special relationship that has allowed the two countries to co-operate in ways that are mutually beneficial.

The two sides are developing a common security approach to border protection designed to speed up the flow of goods and people, but a new fee would merely undermine that process and the ultimate goal of a continental security strategy.

Editorials are the consensus view of the Winnipeg Free Press’ editorial board, comprising Gerald Flood, Catherine Mitchell, David O’Brien and Paul Samyn.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition April 23, 2013 A8

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Andrew Ladd reflects on the season

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • Marc Gallant / Winnipeg Free Press.  Local- (Standup Photo). Watcher in the woods. A young deer peers from the forest while eating leaves by Cricket Drive in Assiniboine Park. A group of eight deer were seen in the park. 060508.
  • KEN GIGLIOTTI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS / Jan 10  2011 ‚Äì WEB STDUP ‚Äì Frosty morning at -15 degrees C , in pic frost covers the the Nellie McClung statue  on the MB Legislature grounds at 7am

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you think Manitoba needs stronger regulations for temporary workers?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google