Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Scale model

  • Print

The Harper government is congratulating itself on its new medical marijuana program that will see a number of lucky applicants get federal licences to grow and sell pot for those who have doctors' notes showing a toke would alleviate the side-effects of their chronic illnesses. It will be a "free" market -- no holds barred on price or volume for the licence holders.

The idea is if you grow the best weed, the customers will come. Competition, then, should keep prices down and satisfaction high. That remains to be seen. The government's record on this file has been less than sterling. It tried growing the stuff, in a mine at Flin Flon, but that pot missed the mark. It allowed small, licensed growers to produce just a little bit, but then found the market demand outstripped their ability to control the flow.

So now the ailing will buy from the manufacturers, who will produce standardized weed in indoor operations under high security after vetting by the RCMP. But with this much bureaucracy all over the "free market," the hope for cheap pot may look more like a pipe dream. All this for a drug that is no worse or better than alcohol, and whose popularity indicates Canadians over the generations have declared safe. The cheaper, more reasonable option is to decriminalize and regulate pot and let the real free market determine price, quality and demand.

Editorials are the consensus view of the Winnipeg Free Press’ editorial board, comprising Catherine Mitchell, David O’Brien and Paul Samyn.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition October 1, 2013 A8

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

O'Shea says the team is going to stick to the plan after first loss

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL.HOSSACK@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 101130-Winnipeg Free Press Columns of light reach skyward to the stars above Sanford Mb Tuesday night. The effect is produced by streetlights refracting through ice crystals suspended in the air on humid winter nights. Stand Up.....
  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should political leaders be highly visible on the frontlines of flood fights and other natural disasters?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google