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Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Look what's on our class's night table

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During a recent library period, Windsor School librarian Micheline Poirier reminded the Class of 2017 to check out age-appropriate materials.

"Hey guys," she told the (mostly) 11-year-olds, "no taking out easy books. You're able to read fiction now."

We took a peek into some of their book bags to see if they complied, and to find out what written works hold a pre-teen's attention these days.

CRACKER! THE BEST DOG

IN VIETNAM

by Cynthia Kadohata

(historical fiction)

"It's about one of the dogs that was trained to go to war in Vietnam and it's really good. I can't keep reading a book if I'm not into it. For non-fiction, I like war books, and for fiction I like stuff about the medieval ages."

Thomas

SWINDLE

by Gordon Korman

"It's about a kid who finds a baseball card. He takes it to this collector place because it's really old, but the guy there says it's fake and so it's only worth $120. Later, the kid sees the guy on TV saying the card is worth $1 million, so he tries to break into the store and steal it back.

"I like the kind of books where kids try to pull off weird things -- stories about stuff that happens to kids and how they make it through."

Noah

MAGIC TREE HOUSE SERIES

by Mary Pope Osborne

"I don't care if they're too young; I still like to read Magic Tree House books. They're about two kids called Jack and Annie. One day they go for a walk in the woods and they find this magical tree house. They go in there and look at a book and end up in whatever place they read about in the book. And usually they have some sort of mission there."

Garrett

WHATEVER HAPPENED

TO JANIE?

by Caroline B. Cooney

"There are four books in the series. I really like mysteries. And usually I like books where the girl or whoever is telling the story, not the author."

Sydney

AMULET

by Kazu Kibuishi (comic book/graphic novel)

"There's this girl and she has this stone and it's a necklace. It's magic, but she controls it. She's called a Stonekeeper and they're trying to save a bunch of cities from the Elf King.

"My favourite books are usually fantasy."

Avery

REX ZERO:

THE GREAT PRETENDER

by Tim Wynne-Jones

"It's kind of a mystery about this kid named Rex Zero. I like fantasy and I kind of like mystery books, too. My favourite series is The Last Apprentice series (by Joseph Delaney).

Liam

HARRY POTTER AND

THE DEATHLY HALLOWS

by J.K. Rowling

"I'm rereading it because I have nothing else to read right now -- and it's a really good book."

Hailey

MUD CITY

by Deborah Ellis

"It's a story that takes place in Afghanistan, Pakistan - places like that. Parts of it were upsetting, like when this girl dresses up like a boy to get a job and money and stuff like that.

"It's surprising to me how many people aren't living like we are. Some of them live in refugee camps.

"I don't really like fiction. I mean, sometimes I like fake books if they're interesting, but not cartoony fiction, like books based on TV shows. The book I'm reading now is based on something real."

Naomi

PERCY JACKSON AND

THE OLYMPIANS

by Rick Riordan

"I've read three books in the series and now I'm reading The Battle of the Labyrinth. It's like one of those mystical books."

Mason

THE FACE ON THE MILK CARTON

by Caroline B. Cooney

"I like mystery that's not old like Nancy Drew -- new stuff that was recently published."

Aby

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition December 11, 2010 h5

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