Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Bumps or cones could work

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Readers suggest alternative methods to slow traffic in school zones.

JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS ARCHIVES Enlarge Image

Readers suggest alternative methods to slow traffic in school zones. Photo Store

Re: School zones to get lower speed limits (Sept. 17). If reducing the speed limit in a school zone genuinely arises from a concern for child safety, then it is imperative that speed bumps, or "sleeping police," get installed at each end of the school zone on a residential street.

They are effective on private property, as in every shopping centre parking lot and on selected residential streets. There is no further need for police enforcement.

Speed bumps get drivers to slow down, 24 hours a day, in a school zone. This reinforces the behaviour and protects people who use school facilities after regular school hours. So is this about child safety or just about some new cash-grabbing speed traps?

VIC MIKOLAYENKO

Winnipeg

 

As a winter resident of Mesa, Ariz., I drive through that city's school zones almost daily. They have clearly posted large signs that state 15 miles per hour, as well as a number of large traffic cones in the middle of the roadway.

The traffic cones stay on the road throughout the school day, and I have yet to encounter a motorist who exceeds the limit during school hours. I know our streets are not as wide as in Mesa, but a couple of traffic cones on the road in front of schools would certainly give drivers a warning to slow down.

BOB MACDONALD

Winnipeg

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition September 18, 2013 A10

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