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Don't forget flood victims

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Water from the Portage Diversion spills over into neighbouring fields.

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Water from the Portage Diversion spills over into neighbouring fields. Photo Store

Like many people around Lake Manitoba, I read with interest two articles that gave me pause. In conversation with the premier, (After the train wreck, Jan. 4) the flooding of Lake Manitoba was a footnote to justify raising the sales tax. An excellent editorial (A vision without a paddle, Jan. 4) raised questions about the future development of The Forks, and referenced a need to regulate Winnipeg rivers.

As someone affected by the provincial government's decision to flood Lake Manitoba in 2011 and who was displaced for a year as a result, the articles together are frustrating. Reports were commissioned to review the flooding and recommend needed changes. At the top of the list was the need to build an outlet at the north end of Lake Manitoba to offset the potential of more flooding.

When manipulating nature, a sound and comprehensive plan must take place. A focus on The Forks may well affect the operation of the Portage Diversion and in turn the safety of people living and working along Lake Manitoba.

The flooding and its aftermath left many homeless, caused extensive damage to the environment, decimated the commercial-fishing industry, and forced homeowners to cover major costs of restoring homes.

The interests of land developers and commercial enterprise cannot be allowed to risk a repeat of the artificial flooding of 2011.

Regulate Lake Manitoba. Build a permanent northern outlet. Demonstrate leadership and planning to encourage those of us rebuilding our homes and lives.

We expect nothing less from our elected representatives.

JACK KING

St. Laurent

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 9, 2014 A12

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