Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Have your say

  • Print

Assessing a leader

Your editorial Mandela's gift to Canada (Dec. 7), which outlined the history that led the late Nelson Mandela to Canada, was marvellous. I especially like the final sentence, which suggests that Mandela's legacy might guide Canada toward more reconciliation between our diverse people.

The tributes to Mandela are well-earned by this ethical leader who understood that compassion and reconciliation were more important than hatred and retribution in dealing with so-called bad people.

Send a Letter to the Editor

  • The Free Press welcomes letters from readers

    To send a letter for consideration on our Letters page: Fill out our online form at the link above, or Email letters@freepress.mb.ca, or Fax (204) 697-7412, or Mail Letters to the Editor, 1355 Mountain Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R2X 3B6.

Why are there not more ethical leaders? Hopefully, Manitoba will produce one or more leaders whose names will be remembered after their departure from power.

Can we not elect or elevate citizens to greater concern for a just distribution of resources, especially for the disabled and the unemployed? Much unemployment is due to mental illness, whether chronic or episodic. Can we not forge a system of support for such people?

Humane leaders who care less for monetary advance and more for justice and concern for the future are needed. Although our lifespan is extending, equability is declining as the income gap widens.

U.S. President Barack Obama offers a suggestion of dollar increases in the minimum wage, although some Republicans and perhaps some Canadians may see this as thwarting our economic system. Perhaps justice will prevail in the longer run as Mandela implied with his life of dignity and truth. Hopefully, one or more Manitobans will follow his good example.

BARRY HAMMOND

Winnipeg

 

I find it interesting that South Africa had an island offshore where they kept political prisoners; in Nelson Mandela's case, for 27 years. They called the prisoners terrorists. There are eerie similarities to Guantanamo, except the prisoners there have had no trial.

They released Mandela thinking that he would be too old and out of touch to do any harm to the regime. I wonder if Omar Khadr could rise to Mandela's level when he is released from prison in Canada?

MICHAEL RILEY

Kelowna, B.C.

 

I question whether Stephen Harper is worthy to attend the funeral of Nelson Mandela since he announced that Canadian foreign policy will henceforth be based foremost on economic considerations.

Not aid and development, nor human rights, nor social justice, just dollars and cents.

Such heartless indifference would once have led Canada to oppose -- not lead and support -- the boycott against South Africa that eventually earned Nelson Mandela and his nation their freedom.

Mandela once stated, "We shall never forget how millions of people around the world joined us in solidarity to fight the injustice of our oppression." This was a tribute to all those with the integrity to put monetary considerations in their proper place.

Canadians can only hope that Harper will take Mandela's words -- indeed, the example of his generous, courageous life -- to heart and return a better man for it.

MIKE WARD

Duncan, B.C.

 

I find it interesting that in all the publicity related to Nelson Mandela, I have seen very little about his second wife, Winnie.

If it would not have been for her informing the public and the heads of state about his plight and keeping his name on people's tongues, he would have rotted in jail. He was not a popular politician, because he was the head of the African National Congress, a communist organization. This led to his imprisonment in the first place.

His image has been cleaned and polished, and he now has the status of a saint. The media have chosen very carefully the quotes they print, because there were many that would not have been acceptable for a saint.

FLORENCE WIENS

Winnipeg

 

Two different Israels

Re: PM shines at Jewish gala dinner (Dec. 2). So the Jewish National Association wined and dined our prime minister, who in turn "reiterated Canada will continue to back Israel in the United Nations and abroad preaching Israel's right to exist."

Is this the same Israel that has ignored literally dozens of UN resolutions in respect to its treatment of Palestinians? Is this the same Israel that has flagrantly violated the human rights of people who have inhabited the land for centuries by unlawfully occupying UN designated Palestinian territory, cutting off their water supply, destroying their farms, orchards and homes, preventing their children from attending school, curtailing their movement and on and on?

Is this the same PM who only a few weeks ago boycotted the Commonwealth meetings because of the host country's human rights record?

WALTER WIEBE

Morden

 

Senate legitimacy lost

If the Senate had still any reason for existing, it lost it with the vote against having Michael Runia testify at a Senate committee.

Personally, I was still sitting on the fence regarding abolition of the Senate. Some bad apples produced some good stuff, and all that.

However, the vote is anything but "second sober thought." The venerable institution has basically turned into a coverup for the alleged wrongdoings of one or more of its members.

There go the last vestiges of legitimacy. Hopefully, other provinces will vote for abolition, like Manitoba did.

RUDY AMBTMAN

Winnipeg

 

Reaping the benefits

What a relief it was to learn from Vince Warden (A simple calculation, Letters, Dec. 3) that the Wuskwatim generating station will be paid for, at 7.5 cents per kilowatt hour, in only 67 years, just before it's time to replace it.

It's too bad that most of Warden's grandchildren and my own will not likely be around to reap the benefits of this wonderful investment.

In pointing out that Manitoba Hydro had deducted over $500 million in reporting the cost of the $1.8-million Wuskwatim in its 2013 annual report, I did not suggest that ratepayers should be charged doubly for costs that were covered from internally generated funds, as Warden insinuates.

The point was simply that it doesn't matter that the $500 million was internally generated and that the remainder will be amortized over the life of the facility. Both sources are just different pockets of the same ratepayer.

I am well aware that Warden, a former CFO of Manitoba Hydro, must understand this point but I am puzzled why he insists that it is appropriate to report annual losses calculated using only part of the cost of the facility.

GARLAND LALIBERTâ

Bipole III Coalition

Winnipeg

 

Like being the king

In his Nov. 28 letter, Governing by politeness, Robert Foster expresses the reality of so-called public consultation in Manitoba. From everything I've seen in Winnipeg, from the sprawl of Waverley West, to backroom land swaps, from the building of fire halls and police headquarters to the massive indebtedness of Bipole III, every level of government has interpreted having been elected as synonymous with being crowned king in centuries past.

However, I'd like to suggest the headline was inaccurate. It should have read "Arrogance and megalomania."

SHANE NESTRUCK

Winnipeg

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition December 10, 2013 A8

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Spring fashion trends

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • MIKE APORIUS/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS STANDUP - pretty sunflower in field off HWY 206 near Bird's Hill Park Thursday August 09/2007
  • JOE BRYKSA/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Local- A large osprey lands in it's nest in a hydro pole on Hyw 59  near the Hillside Beach turnoff turn off. Osprey a large narrow winged hawk which can have a wingspan of over 54 inches are making a incredible recovery since pesticide use of the 1950's and  1960's- For the last two decades these fish hawks have been reappearing in the Lake Winnipeg area- Aug 03, 2005

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

What are you most looking forward to this Easter weekend?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google