Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Is it about safety?

  • Print

Re: Harper targets mentally ill offenders (Feb. 9). We all want to have a safer society. The current debate leads me to wonder, what is the purpose of our justice system? Is it merely to punish, or is it to protect the public by reducing the likelihood that a person who has been convicted of a crime will reoffend?

Let's look at the facts:

Only .001 per cent of Canadians who have been charged with a Criminal Code violation are found "not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder" in relation to a violent crime.

Recidivism rate of that 0.001 per cent, is only 2.5-7.5 per cent.

Recidivism rate of federal offenders in the regular justice system is 41-44 per cent

Most persons found NCRMD under the current system already spend longer periods of time under the supervision of the review board, than if they had gone to jail.

Persons whose illness responds to treatment are no more dangerous than anyone in the general population. The true "high-risk" comes from untreated or refractory illness.

Every illness is individual -- of several people with any illness, none will recover or improve at the same rate.

Therefore, if the purpose of the justice system is to increase public safety, does the proposed new legislation actually make anyone safer? Perhaps our attention would be better turned to improving the recidivism rates of the regular justice system.

I suggest that the real solution for public safety is an increase in prevention and social supports that will encourage more early recognition and treatment of mental illness.

 

WILMA SCHROEDER

President, Manitoba Schizophrenia Society

Winnipeg

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 13, 2013 A10

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Kevin Cheveldayoff announces Maurice contract extension

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • Goose sits in high grass near Marion Friday afternoon for cover -See Bryksa 30 Day goose challenge- Day 18 - May 25, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • MIKE.DEAL@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 110621 - Tuesday, June 21, 2011 -  Doug Chorney, president Keystone Agricultural Producers flight over South Western Manitoba to check on the condition of farming fields. MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
my2011poy

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Now that the snow is mostly gone, what are your plans?

View Results

Ads by Google