Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Tribe vs. tribe

  • Print

In response to Pat Morrow (Religion at root, Feb. 13), I present the First World War, Second World War, the Cold War and all its connected conflicts. What do all of the largest wars of the last century have in common? They all have nothing to do with religion.

Now if I were to take my own selective view of history I could come up with a simplistic conclusion similar to Morrow's that nationalism and political ideology are at the root of war and atrocities. But the actual root of our inhumanity is human nature.

We've inherited from our prehistoric ancestors brains that are wired to divide ourselves into different groups. The lines that we draw can be religion but they can also, be race, language, nationality, politics, or anything that makes you different from me. In the end it comes down to my tribe versus your tribe.

Take religion out of that equation and history shows we'll fill the gap with something else to justify killing or marginalizing each other.

ROBERT REKRUT

Winnipeg

 

Pat Morrow ignores the evil perpetrated by the avowed atheists who first rose to power in the 20th century: Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, and others.

The real answer lies in our evolution toward a species where in "pecking order" is of primary importance. Almost all religions call for a conscious rejection of this innate drive to be "first." Religions generally call us to replace this drive to aggrandize the self with compassion for the other, the neighbour in our community, to accept that we are all fundamentally equal and that we are obligated to each other. What are the principles of atheism? It has none, or else it too would be a religion, albeit a godless one.

The fact is that we as specific individuals, theist and atheist alike, will often succumb to our nature and pervert the principles we profess to hold dear. It should not really be a surprise that we tend only to pay lip service to principles of non-violence, justice, and community well-being, given the path of our evolution so far.

At the very least, religion calls us to choose another way. And change is hard.

RUDY PETERS

Winnipeg

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 16, 2013 A14

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Key of Bart - Evil Las Vegas

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • Down the Hatch- A pelican swallows a fresh fish that it caught on the Red River near Lockport, Manitoba. Wednesday morning- May 01, 2013   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should panhandling at intersections be banned?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google