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Capsule sealed, will make descent in fall

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From left to right, the co-chairs of the Transcona Centennial Time Capsule Committee, Brian Hodgert, Donna Wyatt, and Ken Butchart are shown with the vice-chairs of the Transcona Centennial Steering Committee Barb Culbertson and Peter Martin. The time capsule was recently sealed, and will be buried in September.  
Missing: Murray Rougeau

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From left to right, the co-chairs of the Transcona Centennial Time Capsule Committee, Brian Hodgert, Donna Wyatt, and Ken Butchart are shown with the vice-chairs of the Transcona Centennial Steering Committee Barb Culbertson and Peter Martin. The time capsule was recently sealed, and will be buried in September. Missing: Murray Rougeau Photo Store

Several pieces of Transcona’s modern history are set to go deep underground.

A time capsule, with 64 items ranging from a L’Arche Tova Café menu to tickets to Transcona’s Centennial Social and numerous newspaper articles from various sources, including The Herald, was sealed in mid-June.

The capsule will be on display at the Transcona Historical Museum, and will be buried in September in conjunction with the reopening of Transcona Centennial Square, which was originally supposed to happen in April. The capsule will be brought back to the surface in 2062.

The idea for the capsule came from the Transcona Centennial Steering Committee of Peter Martin, Murray Rogueau, and Barb Culbertson, and the time capsule committee of Donna Wyatt, Ken Butchart, and Brian Hodgert was then formed.

There are some items that residents worked hard to get done in time, as Murdoch MacKay students put together a compact disc of current fashions, and Peter Martin, also known as Hi Neighbour Sam, submitted a recording of 100 interviews he did with local residents. The transcriptions of the interviews are also included.

"The contents were supposed to be a snapshot of 2012," Wyatt said. "It was originally supposed to be just Transcona, but it became broader than that."

She said the committee was planning on digging up the capsule in 2037, but then decided not enough time will have passed to really appreciate the changes in society.

"There may not be that much different, so that’s why we chose 50 years," she said, noting the committee included photos of phone booths and gas pumps, as they might not be around at that time. "The people 50 years from now will say ‘I remember that, we used to do it that way, but we do it (this) way now.’"

Wyatt said though archives and other record-keeping has improved dramatically over the years, she hopes future residents discover a "hands-on" history, especially as a lot of the items pertained to how the community marked its 100th anniversary.

"People aren’t going to look up that kind of thing in an archive — what kind of party did you have?" added Culbertson.

Wyatt credited museum assistant curator Carolyn Sirett, who specializes in preservation, with helping to make sure the items will last while in the ground.

"We had to be careful about the type of contents we put in there, because it had to last 50 years," Wyatt said. "It had to be material that wouldn’t contaminate other things.
"When they open it in 50 years, hopefully it’s good as new."

The 3/16-inch stainless steel capsule has dimensions of 18 inches by 18 inches by 12 inches, and was designed by Murdoch MacKay Grade 12 student Dayne Dusyk, who organizers said jumped at the opportunity to work on it.

They hope he’ll be back for the unearthing.

"We said ‘You could be there with your wife, your children, and maybe grandchildren and say ‘I did that,’" said Butchart.

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