Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

Soccer future in safe hands

  • Print
Glenlawn Collegiate student Alic Rasmussen, 15, recently participated in the Canadian Soccer Association’s U15 national men’s team camp in Florida. He started playing between the sticks at the age of 10 and hasn’t looked back since. Rasmussen hopes to play soccer professionally.

PHOTO BY JORDAN THOMPSON Enlarge Image

Glenlawn Collegiate student Alic Rasmussen, 15, recently participated in the Canadian Soccer Association’s U15 national men’s team camp in Florida. He started playing between the sticks at the age of 10 and hasn’t looked back since. Rasmussen hopes to play soccer professionally. Photo Store

Alic Rasmussen keeps kicking it up a notch.

Rasmussen recently participated in the Canadian Soccer Association’s U15 national men’s team camp in Florida from Nov. 9 to 16.

The 15-year-old goalkeeper, who plays for the Bonivital Flames at the premier level, was one of two Manitoba-based players who took part in the camp along with Winnipeg South End United’s Julian Avila.

It was the team’s second camp of the year under head coach Ante Jazic. The two local youth were selected based on their performances with the provincial All Stars program and performance with the province’s National Development
Centre program, officials say.

Rasmussen also participated in the team’s first tour last August in Mexico. The teen said the recent camp was an invaluable and inspiring.

During the camp in Florida, the Canadians played two exhibition games against their U.S. counterparts and also watched the Honduran men’s national side in training, Rasmussen said.

"It was inspiring to see how Honduras practised. They were intense, high-paced, sharp and made no mistakes," said Rasmussen, who lives in Elmwood and attends Glenlawn Collegiate as part of the NDC program.

"The level we played was much more competitive than in Winnipeg. I loved playing with those guys, as it brings up the level of your game."

Rasmussen said he hopes to eventually land a contract with a professional club and fulfil his dream of playing for the men’s national team.

"I want to keep working hard and get better and better. I’ve been asked to go to try out at Toronto FC and we’re working out all the details right now," he said, noting his favourite player is Manchester City and England goalkeeper Joe Hart.

Rasmussen first played in goal while playing for Phoenix Soccer Club at the age of 10 and hasn’t looked back since.

"I love taking control of the game and leading the defence from the back," he said.
Rasmussen’s NDC schedule includes a 90-minute morning training session at the University of Manitoba before school.

"This has helped my development a lot and it helps everyone build character," Rasmussen said. "It also helps to have such a great staff."

Rob Gale, the Manitoba Soccer Association’s technical director and the head coach of Canada’s U16 and U18 teams, said the achievements of Rasmussen and Avila demonstrate the importance of the grassroots soccer structure at the provincial level.

"I’m delighted for these two lads that their performances propelled them into contention to be selected for the national team," Gale said. "These two boys have been great leaders and dedicated to personal improvement and are a great example to others in our programs."

So what advice does Rasmussen have for young, upcoming soccer players?

"Always have fun playing the game and never let that slip your mind. And always work hard and never give up."

For more information, visit www.manitobasoccer.ca

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

This Just In Twitter bird

  • HeraldWPG

    @HeraldWPG: Elmwood correspondent Bertha Klassen brings some perspective to the tough winter season ow.ly/vPabE #cbn 12:02 pm on Apr 20

Readers‘ Choice Awards

Best Of Winnipeg Readers Survey

Make your choice in the Canstar Community News‘ Best of Winnipeg Readers‘ Choice Awards

Vote Now

Poll

Do you think cameras should be allowed in Manitoba courtrooms?

View Results

View Related Story