Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

Algae blooms a source of concern for neighbourhood

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The retention ponds on Shorehill and Southside drives in Royalwood have developed an algae bloom this summer. While not immediately harmful, the City of Winnipeg has recommendations on how Royalwood residents can help reduce the algae.


The ponds act as natural filters, removing sediment and chemicals from land drainage runoff before the water drains to our rivers. Excessive levels of chemicals such as lawn fertilizers create ideal conditions for algae blooms.


Royalwood residents can do their part to keep our retention ponds healthy homes for birds, fish, turtles, and frogs.


As of January 2009, provincial legislation prohibits the use of fertilizer, even zero phosphorous fertilizer, within three metres of the ponds as well as the Seine River.


For those without property backing onto bodies of water, using less lawn fertilizer and picking up dog waste will make a difference. These materials contain nitrogen and phosphorus, which are nutrients for algae and weeds.  


Royalwood is one of the few communities in Winnipeg with naturalized wetland areas featuring native grasses and vegetation. For more information about Royalwood’s unique and distinctive retention ponds, visit www.winnipeg.ca.


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While the real estate market in Canada is cooling down, reports show the market continues to grow here in Winnipeg.


So why does it seem that homes have been taking so long to sell in Royalwood, one of Winnipeg’s most desirable neighbourhoods?


"What we saw over the summer was a regular rhythm in sales. People prefer to close on the purchase of a home from April to June, in order to enjoy the summer, get settled, and register their children in new schools if need be," explains Jo-anne Hiebert, a sales associate with RE/MAX Performance and a Royalwood resident.


"Many homes in Royalwood sell for more than $500,000, and once you get into that market, you have less than 3% of homebuyers able to purchase in that range. Royalwood is in fact selling above par because many homes are less than five years old, and it is a beautiful community close to a number of amenities."


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 With the start of another school year, Royalwood residents are reminded to be aware and practice school bus safety.


 According to Manitoba Public Insurance, motorists approaching from the front or rear of a school bus with flashing lights or other warning devices must stop at least five metres from the bus and remain stopped until the signal is turned off or the bus starts up again.


A school bus with flashing amber lights means it’s about to stop, and drivers must prepare to stop.


Drivers should also be cautious about proceeding even after the bus driver has turned off the flasher. Children are prone to sudden and unpredictable movements.


In addition to public school division buses, Royalwood residents need to watch for private school buses. For example, St. John’s-Ravenscourt School is running a Beaver Bus Lines bus for Royalwood students from kindergarten to Grade 12.


To learn more about school bus safety and rules of the road, visit www.mpi.mb.ca.


Tanya Misseghers is a community correspondent for Royalwood. You can contact her at tanya.royalwood@gmail.com.

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