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Snowmobiling on sea ice is an adventure

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Krystalle Ramlakhan snowmobiling on Frobisher Bay.

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Krystalle Ramlakhan snowmobiling on Frobisher Bay. Photo Store

I’ve spent about half a year living in Iqaluit, Nunavut ,working for CBC News but I am still experiencing new things.


I went snowmobiling for the first time. Not just the first time in Nunavut, the first time ever. Hard to imagine for a girl who comes from the land of ice and snow better known as Winnipeg.


The trip was about four hours. My homemade parka kept me warm. Iqaluit is right on Frobisher Bay. I went across the bay on the sea ice which was incredibly bumpy and terrifying but I got used to the rough ride after a couple of kilometres. It’s about 26 kilometres across the bayl so Itravelled more than 50 kilometers there and back. My body ached for a few days afterwards from the bumpy ride.


The area where the water meets the land across the bay is extremely jagged. The tides of the Arctic Ocean create hills as the water meets the land so it’s quite the trick to get over them on a snowmobile. I saw some ice formations about 20 feet high.


After making it through the ice field, I followed a trail that goes all the way to Kimmirut, one of the 25 communities in Nunavut. The trail is in Katannilik Territorial Park, one of 13 territorial parks here.


I also tried seal meat the other day. If you’ve read my previous columns you know that I’ve enjoyed trying country or traditional food here.


I got to try an array of foods at the International Women’s Day celebration at Inuksuk High School. There was a spread of Indian, Italian, Jamaican, Asian, traditional food, and more. The event emulated the wide range of cultures and strong sense of community in Iqaluit.

Krystalle Ramlahkhan is a community correspondent for St. Vital. She can be reached at krystalle.ramlakhan@gmail.com

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