Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

Happyland kept Winnipeg residents amused

  • Print

One hundred years ago, my street was an amusement park.


Instead of my house, there was a rollercoaster. In place of the majestic and ailing elm trees were a bandstand, baseball diamond, an open-air ice cream parlour and an 80-foot high circular swing.
From 1906 to 1914, Happyland Park stood on the stretch of land between Aubrey and Dominion Streets and Portage Avenue and the Assiniboine River.


Before Wolseley was Wolseley and the neighbourhood was still on the outskirts of town, the American-owned amusement park drew thousands of visitors weekly until financial burdens forced it to close.


Happyland’s other attractions included Japanese tea gardens, a romantic boat ride for lovers through ‘Ye Olde Mill, a miniature train, penny arcade, and a baseball park for the former Winnipeg Maroons baseball club.


The entrance to the park was Doric in architectural style with a big sign reading Happyland that lit up at night. The park officially opened during the last week of May in 1906, with attendance figures reaching as high as 44,000.


Aubrey, Sherburn, Garfield, and Dominion Streets were therefore not fully developed until after the First World War — a few years after many Wolseley homes.


Laina Hughes is a community correspondent for Wolseley. She launches her book Wolseley Stories on Thursday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m.McNally Robinson.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Fall Arts Guide

We preview what’s new and what’s coming up in Winnipeg’s new arts season

View our Fall Arts Guide

Readers' Choice Awards

Best Of Winnipeg Readers Survey

See the results of the 2014 Canstar Community News Best of Winnipeg Readers' Survey.

View Results

This Just In Twitter bird

Poll

Northwest Winnipeg may be getting a new subdivision with homes for 5,400 people. Do you think it’s a good idea?

View Results