Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

How the Assiniboine Forest came to be

  • Print
Keep an open eye for white-tailed deer, rabbits, raccoons and several species of birds, as you never know what might be walking right along side you in the Assiniboine Forest.

SUPPLIED PHOTO Enlarge Image

Keep an open eye for white-tailed deer, rabbits, raccoons and several species of birds, as you never know what might be walking right along side you in the Assiniboine Forest. Photo Store

For 40 years, Assiniboine Forest has officially been a municipal nature park, and with summer finally upon us it’s the perfect time to explore this area that was once slatted for residential development.

 Back in 1920, the area that is now known to us as Assiniboine Forest was meant to become a developed area with roads, houses, and everything comes with setting up a community.

At the time it was located in the Town of Tuxedo and the appropriate demolition was underway, including necessary clearing for road construction.

Unfortunately with the stock market crash of 1929, and the depression that followed, construction came to a complete stop. Years passed and local residents began using the space for recreational activities, with small areas being used as landfill sites.

 In the 1960s, city councillor Bernie Wolfe went against the Town of Tuxedo residents in an effort to protect the forest and wildlife within the area.

In 1971, the Town of Tuxedo officially joined the City of Winnipeg and although there was still competition to renew construction plans, area residents and the Assiniboine Park Centennial Committee ensured Assiniboine Forest became a preserved Municipal Nature Park in1973.

 Whether you choose to walk, hike, or bike through the forest, there is lots to see and many paths to choose from. Keep an open eye for white-tailed deer, rabbits, raccoons and several species of birds, as you never know what might be walking right along side you.

The forest has about 10 different paths made up of either limestone, woodchip or paved cement and, depending on what routes you decide to explore, you can fill an entire afternoon. The highlight for many is the Eve Werier Memorial Pond, located close to the heart of the forest. The beautiful atmosphere will encourage anyone who comes by to enjoy an extra moment or two soaking up the scenery of wildlife and nature.

 If you would like to know more about the Assiniboine Forest, its wildlife, plants and history, the City of Winnipeg hosts interpretive hikes for small or large groups. For complete details and booking information, call 311.

Travis Mitchell is a community correspondent for Charleswood. Comments and story ideas can be sent to him at news@travismitchell.ca.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Fall Arts Guide

We preview what’s new and what’s coming up in Winnipeg’s new arts season

View our Fall Arts Guide

Readers' Choice Awards

Best Of Winnipeg Readers Survey

See the results of the 2014 Canstar Community News Best of Winnipeg Readers' Survey.

View Results

This Just In Twitter bird

Poll

Do you intend to visit the CMHR once it’s fully operational?

View Results