Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

Manta sends six swimmers to college

  • Print
Manta members Anik Chartrand (clockwise, from bottom left), Kendra Hinton, Chantal Asselin, Wyatt Yarish, Breanne Siwicki and Karyl Clarete will all be swimming for college or university teams in the fall.

PHOTO BY AVI SAPER Enlarge Image

Manta members Anik Chartrand (clockwise, from bottom left), Kendra Hinton, Chantal Asselin, Wyatt Yarish, Breanne Siwicki and Karyl Clarete will all be swimming for college or university teams in the fall. Photo Store

Several years ago, Manta Swim Club decided to place a renewed emphasis on producing high-performance athletes.

That decision has netted the graduates of the club’s Rayzor Elite program more than $1,000,000 in college and university scholarships.

This year alone, Manta is sending six of its graduates off to school, as Wyatt Yarish (University of Calgary), Karyl Clarete (Iowa State), Breanne Siwicki (University of Minnesota), Chantal Asselin (Rutgers University), Anik Chartrand (Delta State University) and Kendra Hinton (South Dakota State University) all cash in on their countless hours in the pool and the gym.

"We’re seeing the kids who are graduating getting better and better," said head coach Tom Hainey. "U.S. colleges are very picky about who they’re bringing in."

Hainey tells his swimmers that if they survive the elite program, with its 5:45 a.m. morning sessions and three-hour after-school workouts, they will almost certainly attract interest from institutes of higher learning. Thirty-two swimmers between the ages of 14 and 18 are currently in the program.

"We’re careful about who gets in (to the elite program)," he said, "and once they’re in they generally don’t leave. They’re all excited about the possibility of going to school in the States."

Siwicki, who’s been turning heads in recent months as she’s broken the Canadian age-group record in the 400-metre individual medley, as well as numerous provincial records, said it’s been her goal to get a college scholarship "ever since I knew what it was."

"It’s a dream come true," said the St. James resident, who recently swam with the national junior team in Australia. "I worked really hard and did what Tom said. I kind of surprised myself at the (2012) Olympic trials. That changed my outlook."

Chartrand, a long-distance specialist who lives in Southdale, said there’s a domino effect for the whole club when swimmers start to earn scholarships.

"It shows how amazingly dedicated we’ve been for the past six years, training with the team," she said. "If one person starts to sign, you realize you can do it too."

Clarete, a River Heights resident who swims middle-distance freestyle races, said she wasn’t too convinced she could reach the next level until a couple years ago.

"I knew it was possible," she said, "but it didn’t start happening or seem achievable until I saw some of my older friends going to the States. Then it became my goal."

Hainey said the adjustment to university studies is often easier for Manta grads than for a typical student because they’re already adept at managing their time well. Even with their intense training schedule, the swimmers must keep their grades up to continue in the program.

"Academics is always first," Hainey said. "No fooling around. They know there’s no pot of gold in amateur sport. The Olympic team is the ultimate goal, but they’re still going to have to have a degree of some sort. We want them to represent Manta well on the academic side."

The club’s next major event is the world championship trials in early April. Hainey thinks Siwicki and recent grad Chantal Van Landeghem, who’s now at the University of Georgia, both have an excellent chance to make the national team.

avi.saper@canstarnews.com

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Readers' Choice Awards

Best Of Winnipeg Readers Survey

See the results of the 2014 Canstar Community News Best of Winnipeg Readers' Survey.

View Results

This Just In Twitter bird

Poll

Are you surprised drivers continue to flaunt laws against using cell phones while driving?

View Results