Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

Video project tells story of trailblazers

  • Print
Chief Jim Bear, Indian and Metis Friendship Centre executive director Jim Sinclair, Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre executive director Lorne Keeper and Dan Highway at the celebratory feast for Preserving the History of Aboriginal Organizational Development in Winnipeg.

SUPPLIED PHOTO Enlarge Image

Chief Jim Bear, Indian and Metis Friendship Centre executive director Jim Sinclair, Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre executive director Lorne Keeper and Dan Highway at the celebratory feast for Preserving the History of Aboriginal Organizational Development in Winnipeg. Photo Store

Thanks to a local collaborative project, many of the city’s Aboriginal trailblazers are having stories told.

Directed by Dr. John Loxley, an economics professor at the University of Manitoba and Evelyn Peters, a professor in the Urban and Inner City Studies Department at the University of Winnipeg, Preserving the History of Aboriginal Organizational Development in Winnipeg documents Aboriginal activism and the development of Aboriginal organizations in Winnipeg from the 1950s to the 1990s.

"Some years ago I had worked on the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, where I looked at Aboriginal economic development in Winnipeg, which there was and is quite a bit of," Loxley said. "I tried to capture that and also interviewed people about their different approaches, what they were trying to accomplish and why.

"It occurred to me, it’s one thing to try and document the approaches to economic development but it’s another thing to talk to the people who actually initiated it and to record their stories and what they were trying to do and what they think they accomplished."

So, in 2012, Loxley and Peters — along with an advisory committee consisting of Darrell Chippeway, Louise Chippeway, Crystal Greene, Kathy Mallett and Larry Morrissette — began collecting records related to Aboriginal organizational development.

The group conducted over 40 video interviews with Aboriginal organizers and activists.

Chippeway, a rhetoric, writing and communications student at the U of W, says he found the search for records really exciting, although it was also tough at times, as many have either been misplaced or destroyed over the years.

"It was disappointing to hear that but the most gratifying part was when you get the people who say I have all these old annual reports," Chippeway said. "For instance, the Indigenous Women’s Collective from the ’80s, which is now disbanded, I found about 10 annual reports from them. To find something like that and for these documents to now be available to the Aboriginal community and anybody interested in this story, I have a sense of satisfaction."

The interviews and records will be made available by U of M Archives and Special Collections, although Chippeway says it’s merely a holding place until an Aboriginal archives office is formed.

Also, a short video about the project is available on the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives website at policyalternatives.ca/multimedia

On Tues., Oct. 22, the project was celebrated with a feast at Thunderbird House, with dinner provided by Neechi Commons.

"A lot of the people we interviewed were there and there was the short film including some of them," Loxley says. "They were really happy to see they are being recorded and their efforts are being marked and appreciated. It was a really positive event."

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Readers' Choice Awards

Best Of Winnipeg Readers Survey

See the results of the 2014 Canstar Community News Best of Winnipeg Readers' Survey.

View Results

This Just In Twitter bird

Poll

What do you think of the new Blue Bombers uniforms?

View Results

View Related Story