Canstar Community News - ONLINE EDITION

“And butterflies are free to fly...”

  • Print
Writer and visual artist Simone Hébert Allard and her book, Manitoba Butterflies: A Field Guide.

SUPPLIED PHOTO Enlarge Image

Writer and visual artist Simone Hébert Allard and her book, Manitoba Butterflies: A Field Guide. Photo Store

"Butterflies fluttered into my life when I was a very young child," writes Simone Hébert Allard in the preface of her recently released slick, soft-covered book, Manitoba Butterflies: A Field Guide.

"Over the years, I have had many encounters with butterflies at various places, be it in a plant nursery, next to a roadside vegetable stand or at a state-of-the-art butterfly conservatory in Stockholm. Always, I am drawn to them and them to me."

With over 11,000 photographs and illustrations, 101 of Manitoba’s most common butterfly species are presented in splendid full-colour in the book.

"I’m excited by her book," says lepidopterist/evolutionary biologist Jeffery Marcus, an associate professor of biology at the University of Manitoba, says in a telephone interview.

He notes that the publisher asked him to check the manuscript to make sure the book was technically accurate. 

"Simone has created a field guide to native butterflies that will be of interest to scientists, while still being accessible to amateur enthusiasts of all levels of experience," Marcus adds.

Hébert Allard says that each species is photographed in its natural environment and, for the first time, each stage of the butterfly life cycle is presented in a photographic progression that culminates in a life size image of the mature adult butterfly.

She also mentions that the book, published in June by Turnstone Press, has 82 photographic contributors, including 11 of her own photos.

"I found them all over the world, with 45 of the photographers from the U.S.," says Hébert Allard, who has previously published five nature-related children’s books in French and directed a television documentary on Canada’s lake monsters, during an interview at her North End home.

"What I needed to find were people who reared butterflies because I was illustrating the full life cycle —egg, larvae, pupa, adult butterfly. That’s the first time this was done in a Canadian field guide."

Apart from all the details you’d expect from a top-quality field guide, Manitoba Butterflies also offers up a wealth of anecdotal facts and trivia, including a butterfly inspired myth or legend, which will fascinate novices and experts alike.

For example, according to legend, the Aztec believed monarch butterflies to be the incarnation of their fallen warriors, wearing the colours of battle.

"In Mexico, the butterfly was also seen as a symbol representing both the fire and rain gods. The monarch is Manitoba’s largest butterfly. It is the only milkweed butterfly found in Canada and the only monarch of North America to undertake such a long migration."

Hébert Allard adds: "In my book, you’ve also got customized maps that show where each species is found — the hot spots — in Manitoba."

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

Readers' Choice Awards

Best Of Winnipeg Readers Survey

See the results of the 2014 Canstar Community News Best of Winnipeg Readers' Survey.

View Results

This Just In Twitter bird

Poll

How many Fringe shows have you attended or plan to attend this year?

View Results