August 30, 2015


Flood Fight

Living in isolation

Shoal Lake gives Winnipeg water, but band must endure consequences

Young residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation gather on the main dock to their man-made island to fish Wednesday during a special event marking the 100th anniversary for the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg.  (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation take part in event marking the 100th anniversary for the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. The flood disconnected them from the mainland except in the winter, when the temporary bridge they are on connects them via a winter road.  (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents call the winter road Freedom Road, even though it was never finished.  (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation participate in a special ceremony held Wednesday to mark the 100th anniversary of the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Children play on a set of swings near the docks of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation Wednesday just before government officials and dignitaries arrive on their man-made island to mark the 100th anniversary for the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg.    (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
This aqueduct on Shoal Lake provides the water supply for the city of Winnipeg. Shoal Lake 40 First Nation had to be flooded for the duct to be built 100 years ago. The flooding has disconnected the community from the mainland ever since, except for a barge that runs in the summer and a bridge on a winter road.  (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Linda Redsky, a resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, looks into the clear water at the edge of her home where she went through the ice and almost drowned while fetching water in the winter. The community held  an event Wednesday marking the 100th anniversary of the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation take part in event marking the 100th anniversary of the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
The flood disconnected Shoal Lake residents from the mainland except in the winter when the temporary bridge they are on connects them via a winter road.    (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A barge leaves the dock at Shoal Lake 39 First Nation and heads across Shoal Lake to Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, a community that was separated from the mainland after land was flooded to create an aqueduct for City of Winnipeg's water supply 100 years ago.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A fishing boat arrives at the docks of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation Wednesday, bringing government officials and dignitaries to a man-made island for the 100th anniversary event. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Eight-year-old Kyra Wahpay stands on a mound of dirt cleared to make way for a permanent bridge to cross the canal that separates Shoal Lake  40 First Nation from the mainland. The bridge in the background is a temporary bridge that is used in the winter to connect to a winter road, the only time of the year that residents are connected to the mainland.   (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Young residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation gather on the main dock to their man-made island to fish Wednesday during a special event marking the 100th anniversary for the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation take part in event marking the 100th anniversary for the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. The flood disconnected them from the mainland except in the winter, when the temporary bridge they are on connects them via a winter road. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents call the winter road Freedom Road, even though it was never finished. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation participate in a special ceremony held Wednesday to mark the 100th anniversary of the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Children play on a set of swings near the docks of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation Wednesday just before government officials and dignitaries arrive on their man-made island to mark the 100th anniversary for the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
This aqueduct on Shoal Lake provides the water supply for the city of Winnipeg. Shoal Lake 40 First Nation had to be flooded for the duct to be built 100 years ago. The flooding has disconnected the community from the mainland ever since, except for a barge that runs in the summer and a bridge on a winter road. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Linda Redsky, a resident of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, looks into the clear water at the edge of her home where she went through the ice and almost drowned while fetching water in the winter. The community held an event Wednesday marking the 100th anniversary of the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Residents of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation take part in event marking the 100th anniversary of the flooding of their land to provide water for the City of Winnipeg. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
The flood disconnected Shoal Lake residents from the mainland except in the winter when the temporary bridge they are on connects them via a winter road. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A barge leaves the dock at Shoal Lake 39 First Nation and heads across Shoal Lake to Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, a community that was separated from the mainland after land was flooded to create an aqueduct for City of Winnipeg's water supply 100 years ago. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
A fishing boat arrives at the docks of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation Wednesday, bringing government officials and dignitaries to a man-made island for the 100th anniversary event. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)
Eight-year-old Kyra Wahpay stands on a mound of dirt cleared to make way for a permanent bridge to cross the canal that separates Shoal Lake 40 First Nation from the mainland. The bridge in the background is a temporary bridge that is used in the winter to connect to a winter road, the only time of the year that residents are connected to the mainland. - (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press)

Location of Shoal Lake community


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