Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Manitoba athletes are on track for record haul at Canada Games

  • Print

HUNDREDS of Manitoba athletes have history in their sights, with four days of Canada Games festivities yet to play and a week's worth of medals behind.

With 12 days of competition done, Team Manitoba had racked up 22 medals by early Tuesday evening, including a gold, nine silver and 12 bronze. With lots of events yet in play, including more paddling events, fencing, cycling and a whack of team games, the 'Toban contingent is poised to break its record of 29 medals, which it set all the way back in 1989.

"We're doing good, and I still believe we're going to get over that (number)," Team Manitoba chef de mission Ted Bigelow said Tuesday evening, while running between events in Sherbrooke, Quebec. "Our paddling kids are smoking, and they keep going throughout the week. They could get a whack of hardware. And fencing... they promise me they're going to be getting two more medals."

Knock on wood, of course, but so far so good: In the first two days of paddling events, Manitoba's Tom Sherwin notched two bronzes in the one-man canoe-kayak, for the 500- and 1000-metre races, while Hannah Guttormson and Stephanie Lowrie earned bronze in their two-woman 500-metre paddle. On the fencing side of things, Winnipeg's Cam Mackay picked up bronze with his sabre.

Then there was Tyler Mislawchuk, who clinched a silver in the triathlon on Tuesday. It wasn't the colour he went to Quebec to win, but after a season where he almost was sidelined by injury, the silver still glinted bright. "I came just wanting to compete," the Oak Bluff-raised athlete said.

"Triathlon's a sport where it changes and it's very different every single race, because there's so many possibilities. So many different things can go wrong with so many different athletes. I knew I was going to be competitive, but I didn't know where I would place."

Mislawchuk, 18, knows exactly what can go wrong. In July, he was testing the waters of his first professional triathlon in Edmonton and into the bike portion of the race, when a competitor in front of him crashed hard. The crash dragged Mislawchuk down and banged up his leg and ribs, badly. He was on crutches for a week, and couldn't train for three.

At first, Mislawchuk worried the hit to his fitness might put his Canada Games success in jeopardy. But he swam well in Sherbrooke, hit the bike hard, and if it weren't for stomach trouble during the run he might even have closed the five-second gap to first place. Still, as he was running the last kilometre, he gauged the pace of the top four, and realized he'd be coming home with some hardware.

"I had a moment where I enjoyed the good feeling," said Mislawchuk, who will head to the World Cup in London in September before launching his pro career next year. "Then I put my nose to the grindstone, and finished the race... (having been injured) makes it a little bit sweeter."

melissa.martin@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 14, 2013 D4

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Keri Latimer looks for beauty in the dark and the spaces between the notes

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL.HOSSACK@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 090728 / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS White Pelicans belly up to the sushi bar Tuesday afternoon at Lockport. One of North America's largest birds is a common sight along the Red RIver and on Lake Winnipeg. Here the fight each other for fish near the base of Red RIver's control structure, giving human fisher's downstream a run for their money.
  • An American White Pelican takes flight from the banks of the Red River in Lockport, MB. A group of pelicans is referred to as a ‘pod’ and the American White Pelican is the only pelican species to have a horn on its bill. May 16, 2012. SARAH O. SWENSON / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Who are the real Bombers?

View Results

Ads by Google