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Als' great Rodgers gets his pardon

Nebraska grants slotback's request stemming from 1970 gas-station holdup

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'I had 10 minutes of insanity, which has hurt me my whole life,' Rodgers says of conviction.

NATI HARNIK / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge Image

'I had 10 minutes of insanity, which has hurt me my whole life,' Rodgers says of conviction.

 

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Forty-three years after he and two other men held up a gas station following a night of drinking, 1972 Heisman Trophy winner and former Montreal Alouettes great Johnny Rodgers was granted a pardon from the state of Nebraska on Thursday

"I feel like the weight for that particular incident is off my shoulders," Rodgers said after he walked out of his Board of Pardons hearing.

The board voted 3-0 to pardon the 62-year-old Rodgers, who has spent his post-football life as an entrepreneur and pitchman in Omaha.

Rogers was a slotback for the Alouettes from 1973 to 1976, where he was affectionately known as an "ordinary superstar." He was the CFL's outstanding rookie in '73, and the East finalist for outstanding player in 1974 and 1975. He also won a Grey Cup with the Alouettes in 1974.

Rogers who was a first round draft pick by San Diego in the 1973 NFL draft, later played for the Chargers in 1977 and 1978.

Rodgers said he has long regretted what he called an alcohol-fuelled prank in the spring of 1970. The holdup occurred the night after he completed his last day of classes his freshman year and netted $90 that was split three ways. He pleaded guilty to a lesser charge of felony larceny and was sentenced to two years of probation. Rodgers has repeatedly denied that he had a gun during the holdup.

A pardon does not expunge Rodgers' record, but it does restore civil rights he lost after his conviction, such as the right to be a juror, hold public office and hold certain licenses. The board also gave approval for Rodgers to own a firearm, if he chooses to.

The pardons board is made up of Gov. Dave Heineman, Attorney General Jon Bruning and Secretary of State John Gale.

Rodgers, wearing a red shirt under a dark blazer with a "Win Your Life" lapel pin, told the board that he has lived a mostly good life and had met the criteria for a pardon.

"I'm seeking a pardon because this incident happened when I was 17 years old," Rodgers told the board. "I had 10 minutes of insanity, which has hurt me my whole life."

Four friends, including Rodgers' high school quarterback, testified in support of Rodgers. Former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne, who was Rodgers' position coach, wrote a letter of support.

"You've done a lot of good things in your life as far as charity and with kids," Bruning said. "For our purposes, we require 10 years with a clean record and in the end, we treat similar people similarly whether they're widely known or not widely known. Mr. Rodgers has done what we've asked of any applicant."

Heineman said several people had contacted the board to weigh in against a pardon for Rodgers, hinting that he was being given special treatment.

Heineman gave Rodgers an opportunity to answer those who say he was given special consideration because of his status as an All-America football player.

"I don't think there's anything special about what I'm requesting," Rodgers said. "It's been a considerable amount of time that has taken place since the incident and I've actually had a pretty good history of trying to do positive things."

 

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition November 15, 2013 C5

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