NHL

Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Rule changes didn't reduce concussions in NHL, study finds

  • Print

TORONTO -- A recent NHL rule change designed to cut down on the number of concussions in the league hasn't made a difference, a new study suggests.

The research suggests the rule, which outlawed bodychecks aimed at the head and checking from a player's blind side, has not led to lower concussion rates among pro hockey players since it came into force in the 2010-11 season.

The senior author of the work said the league should take another crack at the rule change, noting that as it stands the wording is too subjective and gives referees leeway not to enforce it.

"If player safety is the prime priority of the NHL in bringing this kind of rule in ... then they need to relook at this in a very serious way and adjust things," said Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon who heads the injury prevention research unit at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital.

"If it isn't a priority, I could see them just leaving things the way they are and it's kind of a Band-Aid response to a major problem."

The NHL did not respond Wednesday to a request for comment on the article. And the NHL Players' Association declined to comment because it hadn't had a chance to review the study.

But another concussion expert applauded the work, saying Cusimano and his team had performed a service by exploring the impact of the rule change.

Dr. Charles Tator, a brain surgeon with Toronto Western Hospital, said the change's lack of impact has an effect not just in the arenas of the NHL, but on rinks where kids who dream of making it to the NHL some day emulate their professional heroes.

"Professional hockey is still a bad influence on the amateurs," said Tator, who is project leader for the Canadian Sports Concussion Project at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre.

The study was published Wednesday in the journal PLoS One.

Cusimano and colleagues painstakingly put together data on reports of concussions and suspected concussions -- based on reports of symptoms -- from a variety of sources. Some of the information came from teams, others from media reports.

The information was gathered for both the NHL and the Ontario Hockey League, which has stricter rules on checks to the head than the NHL does. The OHL rule penalizes any hit to the head of another player, intentional or unintentional.

The data showed that there was no statistical significance in the incidence of concussions in the NHL in the 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons compared to the 2009-10 season. That latter was the year before the NHL rule change went into effect.

The researchers estimated there were about 5.23 concussions per 100 games in the NHL regular season. Despite its stiffer rule, the OHL didn't have markedly different concussion rates, clocking 5.05 per 100 games in the regular season.

The analysis also showed that the type of hits outlawed by the NHL rule weren't actually the major cause of concussions.

About 28 per cent of interactions produced a concussion also generated a penalty call, said Cusimano. In that 28 per cent, the bulk of the penalties were for fighting. "And blindsiding, which was what the rule was initially was written about, was only 4.1 per cent of all those.... But four per cent of 28 per cent is a very small number."

"I wasn't totally surprised, but I was disappointed that we weren't able to show a difference," Cusimano said.

"Part of it's the way the rule's written. Part of it's the way the rule is enforced. Part of it's the penalties associated with the rule. And part of it is that concussions are also coming from other causes like fighting, that is still allowed."

The way the NHL rule is worded gives referees outs to avoid levying penalties for some of the hits, for instance in cases where players are deemed to have put themselves in a vulnerable position.

-- The Canadian Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition July 18, 2013 D3

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Shots ring out as police say armed threat "resolved"

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL.HOSSACK@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 090728 / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS White Pelicans belly up to the sushi bar Tuesday afternoon at Lockport. One of North America's largest birds is a common sight along the Red RIver and on Lake Winnipeg. Here the fight each other for fish near the base of Red RIver's control structure, giving human fisher's downstream a run for their money.
  • A Canada goose flies towards the sun near the Perimeter Highway North and Main St Monday afternoon – See Day 10 for Bryksa’s 30 goose project - May 11, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

How surpised are you by the Bombers’ 4-1 start to the season?

View Results

Ads by Google